Meg’s Desk: Tiny living creates order

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Before moving into a tiny home, you may experience some fear, uncertainty and doubt about living successfully there.

As a group, tiny home dwellers seem to be so organized. According to Thurstontalk.com: “There is no clutter, everything has it’s place. ‘I hate single use items,’ says Brittany Yunker. ‘You could get this giant thing that crushes garlic for you or you could use a cutting board and knife.’ She isn’t judging. There simply isn’t enough room.”

Chicken or egg: Is it true that people attracted to tiny homes are inherently organized? Or do these homes help people live in a more organized way?

As a full-time designer, I think about how small spaces create and support a sense of order. Home floor plans reflect unique interests of dwellers, so the location and sizing of great rooms, sleeping quarters, kitchens and baths become very important. When designed well, tiny dwellers gain a sense of “fitting” in their downsized surroundings.

Storage comfort: People care about how they put away or display possessions.

Maybe our genetics play a role, back to our hunter-gatherer ancestors. We focus on things like shelves, corners, lofts and closets. What’s different for tiny homes is that storage isn’t deep. You’ll typically notice one or maybe two layers of objects, easily found, used and returned to their proper place. Since there’s no digging around, organization naturally happens.

The organization comes from slimming down on all the gadgets that, from lack of use, find their way to the back of the drawer or the back of the closet. In a tiny space, everything gets used regularly, so it stays visible and close at hand.

You’re unique: Tiny dwellers do look like they belong in their houses, when living arrangements are optimized.

There’s musicians with their harps and guitars. Others surrounded by more tech gadgets than you’ll ever use. A couple with ski gear outside, and socks drying by the fireplace. And more dwellers who’s places look like they came from an interior design magazine. Everyone has different priorities about what matters to them. The beauty of living in a tiny space is that things which are an integral part of “who you are” come to the forefront.

So don’t be shy about tiny living. It’s not nearly as rough as you think!

 Happy hammering,

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Meg Stephens
Lead Designer
Tumbleweed Tiny House Company

Written by Adam Gurzenski — September 22, 2013

Filed under: Meg  
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