Reclaimed Pine for Reclaimed Life

Tumbleweed Tiny HouseLast year, Tom and Neri, college professors in Santa Fe, New Mexico, made a decision to radically change their lifestyle. They wanted to be more mobile, lessen their carbon footprint, spend more time with their young daughter, and simplify their lives. One of the first things they did was to look for a portable house that would allow them to move at will yet maintain a comfortable, family-friendly home. No surprise that Tumbleweed's Lusby model was the clear choice for their future new home.
At the Tumbleweed Santa Fe Design & Build Workshop a few weeks ago, we met Tom and his friend Pat Crowe who is helping Tom and Neri build their Lusby. Not knowing how to build, Tom enlisted the aide of Pat because of his passion for using salvaged materials for new building construction. Kindred spirits. With the help of Pat, they located a 1910 bungalow in Texas that was about to be torn down. Pat hitched the trailer and drove to Texas to retrieve almost all the reclaimed lumber needed to build the Lusby.
Tumbleweed Tiny HouseTom and Pat are now working together to build the Tumbleweed home from reclaimed wood. Taking a pay-as-you-go approach, work is proceeding at a leisurely but steady pace. The trailer is in place, walls and roof are complete, interior wood finishes and cabinets are done and exterior siding is in progress. Almost all from reclaimed pine from the Texas bungalow. Very soon, Tom and Neri's Lusby will be finished. And then their new adventure will really begin.
Note: Pat Crowe is always excited about the opportunity to salvage old buildings, saving them from slow rot, fire, or the landfill. He is also looking forward to helping other tiny-house folks with their lumber requirements. His web address is www.echoreclamation.com; email is jpatcrowe@comcast.net.

Written by Steve Weissmann — February 15, 2011

Filed under: Build it yourself  

Dee Williams

For six years, Dee Williams has been living in her tiny Tumbleweed home and championed the cause for the Small House Movement.

"I sold my big house and got rid of most of my stuff, limiting myself to about 300 things -- that was everything from heels and a toothbrush, to a couple of dinner plates and a two-ton jack. I then bought a set of plans from Tumbleweed. Four months later I had my tiny dream house."

Dee focused on using recycled materials, and spent just $10,000 building her tiny home. Using her home to promote a shift in consciousness, Dee has been featured on the cover of YES! Magazine, online videos, and opens her home regularly for local house tours. Dee has also written her own eBook called Go House Go. This mini-booklet focuses on how to connect a tiny house to a trailer, and how to keep the walls and roof from twisting, leaning or buckling. Also included is information about moisture control and a common list of building materials.

Written by Steve Weissmann — January 18, 2011

Filed under: Build it yourself  

Mini House Builder

At just 15 years old, Austin Hay decided to build his own Tumbleweed. About 8 months ago, Austin showed up to a Tumbleweed open house and announced that he was going to build the Fencl before he graduated high school. He carefully shared his plan of raising money and enlisting friends and convinced us to donate a set of plans. I was impressed by how persuasive and genuine this young man was.

Over the summer, Austin worked and saved $3,000 to cover the cost of the trailer and beginning supplies. Two weeks ago, we had a chance to catch up with Austin again when he came to our Tiny House Workshop and shared his story with the class.

He said his long term goal with the house was to live in the Fencl while in college and save money on housing. When someone asked if his house "impressed the girls", he shyly admitted "not yet".

Austin just finished the roofing on the house in time for the upcoming rain. Working mostly on Saturday and Sunday, Austin said he's been having fun with it. You can read Austin's blog at minihousebuilder.webs.com

Written by Steve Weissmann — November 22, 2010

Filed under: Build it yourself  

Download Study Plans

Our FREE study plans give you the opportunity to discuss your dreams with an architect or your local building department. The Study Plans give you enough information to talk price and sizes. We've also added material cost estimates for all our homes.

To download, please click on the image below

Written by Steve Weissmann — October 20, 2010

Filed under: Build it yourself   home plans   house plan  

Picking up the trailer

Today was eventful. The snow is almost gone which is unusual for Ontario in March.  It was probably one of the rainiest and windiest days we've had all year. Not a great day for driving a trailer 100 km (60 miles) but we managed.  Dave Cook the owner of Intruder Trailers was fantastic.  He had the 18 foot Suretrac trailer ready to go when we arrived.  The cost was 2895, with taxes it ended up being 3271.  Dave made sure we had the proper hookup for the electrical and a 2 5/16 trailer hitch ball.  They also filled out the paperwork for us to take down to the Ministry of Transportation to get the license we needed.  10 minutes down the road, $35 for the license plate and a quick trip to Tim Horton's for coffee and we were ready to head back to Intruder Trailers where Dave fixed up our trailer hitch and showed us how to hook up the trailer.

The one thing we found out was that most tandem trailers need to undergo a safety check each year if they are going to be on the road.  Hmmm. That was news.  The ministry sites I'd consulted didn't note that anywhere I looked.  They've got height, weight and length restrictions, and the Fencl conforms to all of these.  Whew.

It might be a pain to have to move the house each year for a safety, but it might be enough just to get the safety when we eventually move the house again which could be years after we park it the first time.

Dave was keen about the idea of our tiny house and had even been looking at them on line.  We'll keep him posted as the house goes up.  He also recommended that if indeed we are parking the house for years, we should consider taking off the tires for the duration. He says tires will deteriorate in the sun and be useless after a few years.

Since it was crazy windy, we decided to drive the back roads to return to  Kitchener.  It took about an hour to drive from Nilestown and then another hour just to park the trailer in the shop where the classes will do the building.  They're using one of the auto shops rather than the woodworking shop because of its access to outside.  They've set up workbenches and circular saws in the auto shop and it should work.  Bob and the students will tell you more about the challenges of this space.

All I know is it was very challenging getting the trailer into the space.  I'm sure my husband was ready to scream "Lucccy"  in exasperation.  He probably wanted to swear too, but he refrained. Although the automotive shop is huge, two metal posts that operate the car hoists block the space about 18 feet from the door.  We (and by we I mean my wonderful husband) had to back up the trailer so that it was centered perfectly between these hoists.  Needless to say, this took a long time.  Ultimately we (and again by we I mean my wonderful husband) ended up having to manually lift up the trailer and reposition it so it would fit between the hoists.  There are only a couple of inches of clearance on each side.

I can't believe it is actually happening.

Written by Kitchener Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational School — March 13, 2010

Filed under: Build it yourself  
Tumbleweed Tiny House Company
bodega loring nv
harbinger Whidbey sebastarosa
enesti b53 zglass

Recent Posts

Categories

Recent Comments


Free Catalog

Customer Showcase

Amish Barn Raiser

Tumbleweed Trailer

Take a Video Tour