$500 Discount On Tumbleweed Barn Raisers!

What is a Barn Raiser?

If you're interested in building your own Tumbleweed but find yourself restricted due to time, skill level, tools, etc. a Tumbleweed Barn Raiser might be the best choice for you!

When you purchase a Tumbleweed Barn Raiser, we deliver a partially built Tiny House RV that you can finish yourself! Design your Barn Raiser using our interactive builder and sleep easy knowing that the foundation of your Tiny House RV will be built by professionals.

We estimate that our Barn Raisers save 100-200+ hours on your total build time. We offer 10 different designs / lengths for you to choose from, now including our modern design - the Tumbleweed Mica. 

Our Modern Mica - NOW AVAILABLE AS A BARN RASIER!

Financing Now Available!

We're excited to announce that financing is now available for Tumbleweed Barn Raisers.

  • No Money Down
  • 100% Financing
  • Get funded in 72 hours
  • Interest rates from 3.99% to 8.99%
  • Payments from $213 to $500 per month
  • Sales Tax, registration and shipping costs can be financed too!

For more information on financing, click here.

$500 Discount - Now Through August 31st!

Get a free quote on your Barn Raiser anytime between now and August 31st, 2015 and receive $500 off* the total price! Our specialists are waiting to assist you and answer any questions. 

*discount valid for 30 days after quote is received

Barn Raiser Customer Stories

We like to check in on our Barn Raiser customers occasionally to see how their builds are coming along. It's amazing how every Tiny House RV is different! After delivering the shell, we find that our excited new barn raiser customers infuse their passions and preferences into finishing the build. This really makes their Tiny House RV come alive! See for yourself in a few featured Barn Raiser stories below. 

"JStalls Tiny House"

Jonathan and his Tumbleweed Barn Raiser, after he installed the windows himself!

Jonathan Stalls customized his 24 foot Elm Barn Raiser to have a side door and no porch. He also choose to have Tumbleweed install the metal standing seam roof. Since receiving his Barn Raiser he has installed the windows, cedar siding and front door himself! 

Look at this beautiful and sophisticated Tiny House RV basking in the Colorado sunshine! Follow Jonathan's Build on Facebook.

"Tiny House For Three"

Maighen, Brandy, and their son R.A.D. with their new Tumbleweed Barn Raiser

Using a mixture of materials, Maighen, Brandy and R.A.D have given their Tumbleweed Cypress Barn Raiser uniqueness and flare! We love seeing how creative they've been with their build. A canvas was delivered, but what they've created is a piece of art!

Check out this Texas family's eclectic and colorful Barn Raiser on their website, Instagram and facebook

"Tiny House in the Country" 

Chris's Tumbleweed Barn Raiser (Upon Pick Up)

Chris Schapdick lives in New York City but wanted his young daughter to have a connection to nature. He purchased property in upstate New York and decided to build a tiny mobile cabin for weekend getaways. A Tumbleweed Linden Barn Raiser was perfect for his situation because Chris was limited on time, but wanted the experience of building his own tiny retreat. 

Chris's  Picturesque "Tiny House in the Country," Winter 2015

Follow "Tiny House in the Country" online here

Want more Barn Raiser stories? Check out these blogs:

"The Tiny House the Grandma Built"

"Unskilled Build"

"Tiny Adventures in a Big World"

Written by Jenna Spesard — July 13, 2015

Filed under: Barn Raiser   Build   Construction   Cypress   Discount   Elm   Financing   Linden   Tiny House   Tiny House Movement   Tiny House RV   Tumbleweed  

Roof Shapes for Tiny House RVs

Six Basic Roof Shapes / photo credit

In architecture, the roof shape of a structure will have a big impact on the overall design. Above you can see six basic roof shapes, but for the purposes of this concise article we are only going to discuss the following: 1). Gable Roof, 2). Gambrel Roof, 3). Hipped Roof, and 4). Flat Roof.

Remember there are advantages and disadvantages to every roof shape, but most importantly you should choose the shape that best fits the visual aesthetic of your entire Tiny House RV design.

A Tumbleweed Elm w/ a Gable Roof Shape & Dormers

Gable Roof

When you ask a child to draw a house, what do they usually draw? Answer: A gable roof shape with two windows, a door and perhaps a chimney. The gable roof shape is classic, sophisticated and summons an emotional connection of "home". 

Here is what the interior of a Tiny House RV with a gable roof looks like:

A classic gable roof. *Note, the roof expands to shed dormers in the loft.

This Tiny House RV's great room feels spacious because of the peaked roofline, guiding your eyes skyward. The steep 12:12 roof pitch also allows for easy rain and snow runoff. 

"Runaway Shanty"- Tiny House RV being built on a Tumbleweed Trailer w/ Gambrel Roof Shape

2. Gambrel Roof

The gambrel roof shape is a staple for the traditional American "country home". As you travel through the rural areas of the United States, you will see many examples of the gambrel roof used on farmhouses and barns. You might also see this roof shape used in a few colonial residences around New England. 

Here is what the interior of a Tiny House RV with a gambrel roof looks like:

April's Tiny House RV with a Gambrel Roof Shape

The gambrel roof provides more interior ceiling space than the gable, while also providing a decent slope for snow and rain runoff. That being said, this roof shape is more difficult to construct and will be heavier than a traditional gable.

The Tumbleweed Cypress w/ a Hipped Roof

3). Hipped Roof

The hipped roof, seen here on a Tumbleweed Cypress, is our most popular Tiny House RV design. A visual charmer, hipped roof shapes can be seen all over the country in residential architecture. The design resonates will many home owners, which has lead to its overwhelming popularity. 

Here is what the interior of a Tiny House RV with a hipped roof looks like:

The hipped roof, as seen above in the small loft above the door, slants inward but still provides ample space for storage or a display. 

The Tumbleweed Mica w/ a Flat Roof

4). Flat Roof

The term "flat roof" is a bit of a misnomer. This roof shape is not completely flat, but actuality has a slight slant for rain runoff. Flat roofs are an ancient form of architecture, but the design is still used all over the world today. For example, most green roofs (roofs used for growing vegetation) are flat roofs.

Here is what the interior of a Tiny House RV with a hipped roof looks like:

So which of these roof shapes would you choose for your Tiny House RV? Comment below!

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

Written by Jenna Spesard — April 06, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   Elm   Flat   Gable   Gambrel   Hipped   Mica   Roof   Roof Shapes   Tiny Home   Tiny House   Tiny House RV  

The Advantages of Tiny House Dormers

A dormer is a structural element in architecture that protrudes from a sloped roof and allows for additional space. If you're a tiny house enthusiast, the words "additional space" in a tiny house article might seem oxymoronic. Yes, owning a tiny home means that you are "okay" with small spaces, but there is no reason that you should have to sacrifice comfort in your tiny house RV.

So let's learn a little more about dormers and what they could do for your loft. 

A Tumbleweed Elm or Cypress loft WITHOUT dormers (keeping the gable roof line throughout) and a skylight.

Some tiny housers love the coziness and lightweight option of the un-dormered loft (keeping the triangular gable roof line throughout), but most prefer to have a little more headroom. Dormers provide extra space for comfort and additional windows, while keeping the lovely visual aesthetic. 

Tumbleweed Cypress WITHOUT dormers. A lovely gable roof line throughout.

 

Tumbleweed Elm WITH Dormers. Space is gained. The visual aesthetic is not sacrificed. 

How much space do you really gain by having dormers? In order to visualize how much space is actually gained by adding dormers, you will need to have a basic understanding of roof pitch.

Roof pitch is described as the vertical rise divided by the horizontal span of a roof. The gable roof in our Elm and Cypress models have a 12:12 pitch, while our lofts with dormers have a 3:12 pitch. It is important to maintain some roof pitch for weather runoff. 

Examples of roof pitch. Photo credit: Wikipedia

An older Tumbleweed model, where the 3:12 pitch returns to 12:12 for the last few inches of the loft.

If you peer into the back of this older Tumbleweed's loft, you can see where the 3:12 pitch returns to the triangular gable roof line (12:12 pitch). This is a great way to visualize the difference between these two roof pitches. 

If the above loft DID NOT have dormers:

  • The roof pitch would be that triangular slope throughout
  • The four windows that line the sides of the bed would be lost
  • The space on either side of this queen bed would be lost
  • A king bed would not be possible (only possible with dormers)
  • The use of a staircase would be rather difficult (a ladder would most likely be used instead)

Due to costumer feedback, in all of our current models and plans, the dormers extend all the way to the back of the loft. By doing this, the above Tumbleweed loft has gained even more space. Starting this year, we will also include dormer plans with our Elm and Cypress plans, free of charge.
Steve Weissmann (President of Tumbleweed) is 6'2" and can comfortably sit up in bed in this Cypress loft with dormers. 
By adding dormers to your loft, you will also gain valuable wall space, not only on the sides of your loft, but also in the front and back. Consider the cheek walls: the walls that are formed between your dormers and gable roof. Below is a photo of my loft and, as you can see, we've chosen to add an outlet to our cheek wall. My future plan is to mount a television there one day. I could also add a cabinet, shelving, additional lighting or hang decorations / plants / photographs in this additional space. 
Tiny House Giant Journey's loft with dormers. 
So what do you think? Do you want dormers in your tiny house loft?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — January 26, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   Dormers   Elm   Loft   Tiny home   Tiny House   Tiny house Giant Journey   Tumbleweed  

Three Barn Raiser Stories

What is a Tumbleweed barn raiser?

It's a partial tiny house that you finish yourself. With it you get the assurance that your home has a secure infrastructure built by our professionals. It's a great way to expedite your build, while still getting the DIY experience. For more info, click here.

    Today we'd like to share a few stories from some of our recent barn raiser customers. You'll be amazed how these three barn raisers are going to become three completely different homes!

    First up, Dani Moore (The Tiny House that Grandma Built)

    Dani Moore's barn raiser. A Modified Tumbleweed Elm

    Why did you choose a barn raiser?

    Dani Moore: I have some limitations. I have severe osteoporosis, some nerve damage and some loss of function in my legs so I wear a brace and use a mobility scooter. I knew the roof framing and lofts would be too much for me (to build). I know I can do the interior walls, but the rest would just be too much for me.

    Dani in front of her eye-catching fuchsia door

    Can you tell us more about your home, the size and design/layout you chose?
    Dani: I have a 24 foot Elm, but my downstairs is actually only 18 foot because I have a 6 foot porch and a 12 foot wheelchair ramp. The porch was important so that I have somewhere to park my two mobility scooters while they are charging. I have a huge sleeping loft, almost 10' x 6.' My interior design isn't set yet. I have a 30 inch front door so a mobility scooter or electric wheelchair can fit through it, but most of the time inside I can use a three wheeled stool to slide around. I will definitely need stairs so that, when needed, I can go up and down them on my butt. I would ideally find someone who has the engineering know how to set up a pulley system that I could use to manually lift myself up and down from the loft with a sling chair, but so far I haven't found anyone. Perhaps one of the readers will have the knowledge I need!
    Inside of Dani's Barn Raiser
    Any interesting elements that will make your tiny home special. How about that pink door?

    Dani: I love my fuchsia door! I plan to paint the fascia boards and shutters the same color, then the rest of the trim white. The exterior walls will be a soft lavender.  

    Dani's roof, skylight and Christmas tree

    ----------------------------

    Next up: Jay and Becky Bayne (http://unskilledbuild.wordpress.com/)

    Jay and Becky Bayne's barn raiser in construction at The Shed Yard

    Do you have experience building?

    Jay & Becky: As you may have noticed by our blog name, we have NO construction experience outside of building bird houses and pinewood derby race cars, back when our now about to graduate Eagle Scout was but a Cub. But seriously, we have installed laminate flooring in a previous house, remodeled a bathroom including toilet and tile and done minor electrical repairs.  We are registered for the February Colorado Springs workshop and will be saving a lot of that "technical" stuff for when we get home.  Hope to glean a lot of useful ideas from our workshop peers.

    Jay, Becky and their two sons

    Can you tell us more about your home, the size and design/layout you chose?

    Jay & Becky: We chose the Tumbleweed Cypress 24 with an expanded sleeping loft. The French doors on the side were something we saw on a tiny house post and loved. We enjoy cooking so a near normal size kitchen with full size appliances is a must, as is a tub/shower. There will also be a small staircase to make climbing to our sleeping loft easier for Becky and accessible to our four legged family members.  Jay is looking forward to incorporating his old component tuner and stereo speaker system into the house.  Not exactly space efficient, but the sound is definitely better than ear buds!

    Jay and Becky Bayne's barn raiser in construction at The Shed Yard

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    Last but not least: Jonathon Stalls (https://www.facebook.com/jstallstinyhouse

    Jonathon Stalls's barn raiser 

    Why did you choose a barn raiser?
    Jonathon: I run an amazing, but demanding social business called Walk2Connect and am fortunate to have enough savings to invest in something like this. Time and professional experience without compromising my own creative and desired DIY experience was the main fruit for moving forward with a barn raiser. It was a perfect fit.
    Check out Jonathon's inspiring TedTalk here about his walk across America.
    Can you tell us more about your home, the size and design/layout you chose?
    Jonathon: My home is a 24' customized "Elm" overlook (w/keyhole in loft) design. Its just perfect for what I had envisioned. It has a beautiful long pitched roof and an open floor plan. I wanted the door on the side to have a big front window and a nice sized couch/bed seating area. I wanted an exterior opening door that gives as much space as possible for my 6'4 frame, 90 lb dog and various guests. 
    Jonathon's loft
    Anything you'd like to add about the build experience?
    Jonathon:  I'm beyond blessed by this experience. There is so much joy wrapped up in the planning and building. All of that said, I think I'm in my happiest places when I pull away from a work day and look at the collection of friends and family that have come together to help. Bringing together new and old faces through a tiny house project is inspiring, grounding, and healing. 
    Jonathon's tiny house with some siding installed. His adorable dog will also be sharing this space.
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    *All photos provided by Dani, Jay, Becky and Jonathon. 

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    Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

     

    Written by Jenna Spesard — December 23, 2014

    Filed under: Amish   Barn Raiser   Cypress   Elm   Tiny home   Tiny house  

    Q&A with Tiny House Experts

    We asked three of our tiny house experts to answer a few Frequently Asked Questions:  

    ART CORMIER

    Art Cormier / Tumbleweed Workshop Presenter

    Background:

    In 2012, Art completed his Tumbleweed home using SIPS and reclaimed wood and even posted some videos on YouTube explaining how he did it  And that's how we connected - we asked him if he wanted to partake in our Tumbleweed Construction Video and Art obliged. One thing led to another and today Art is traveling the country teaching others the benefits of owning a tiny home. Read more on Art's blog.

    Art's modified Tumbleweed Elm

    Question: What is your favorite part of your tiny space?

    Art: My favorite part of my tiny house?  The love seat when I want to sit,  or the shower when I want to get clean.  Or do I have those confused?

    Art's love seat, which can convert into a bed.

    Q: Do you have any space saving or downsizing advice?
    Art: See video!
     
    Q: What would you do different in your tiny home if you could build it again?
    Art: If I built it again I would have dormers, got to keep up with the neighbors!
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    EDDIE LANZO
    Eddie Lanzo / Tumbleweed Workshop Host
    Background:
    Eddie and his girlfriend Lacey have their almost complete DIY Tumbleweed Cypress parked in a campground in Austin, Texas. Eddie's background is in real estate and he also recently joined the Tumbleweed team as a workshop host. More about their house and build here
    Eddie's DIY Tumbleweed Cypress
    Question:  How are you decorating your tiny space for the holidays?
    Eddie: We have perched a very wintery wreath on the wall for the holidays. That should do it for us. Next year if we're more ambitious, we want to do a stick christmas tree.
    Q:  Clever storage ideas / space saving ideas?
    Eddie: We plan on adding loft beam storage, installing a leaf table, and putting our compost toilet on tracks that slide out from under the storage stairs.
    Eddie's loft with dormers
    Q: What would you do different in your tiny home if you could build it again?
    Eddie: We would've finished plumbing before moving it to the RV park. It’s all “roughed out” but ABS piping still needs to be finished so we can install our sinks.
    ---------------------------------------
    GUILLAUME DUTILH
    Guillaume Dutilh / Tumbleweed Workshop Host
    Background:
    Guillaume and his girlfriend Jenna finished their DIY modified Cypress since September 2014. So far they've traveled over 7,000 miles with their tiny abode, from California to Nova Scotia to Atlanta, while hosting countless open houses and Tumbleweed workshops. Learn more about their tiny house journey here. 
    Guillaume's traveling DIY Cypress
    Question: What do you do when you and your partner need... space?
    Guillaume: We usually just take the dog for a walk since the front door is never that far. 
    Q: What is biggest benefit of having a tiny house?
    Guillaume: Being able to pursue my passion for photography while traveling.
    Q: What would you do different in your tiny home if you could build it again?
    Guillaume: If I could do it again, I'd have my corner porch on the sidewalk side or I would build a full porch (the Elm). Porches are awesome!

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    Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

    Written by Jenna Spesard — December 10, 2014

    Filed under: Art Cormier   Cypress   Elm   Experts   Holidays   SIPS   Tiny Home   Tiny House   Tiny House Giant Journey   Tiny SIP House   Tips   Tumbleweed   Workshop  

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