5 Blog Post Worth Reading

 

Our blog is designed to keep you up to date on the latest happening in the small house universe. Here are 5 posts that you may have missed:

  1. How to Get Around Building Codes and Zoning for Tiny House Living - TinyHouseTalk.com publisher Alex Pino and Small House Society President Greg Johnson share their insights. You'll really want to note the cities that are beginning to allow tiny houses to be legal dwellings
  2. Have You Considered a Historic Neighborhood for Your Small House? - Kent Griswold, publisher of TinyHouseBlog.com explores an intriguing option for those looking to find a spot for their tiny house.
  3. Building a Tiny House on a Mountain - Laura LaVoie is currently building her tiny house and has shared some very informative information about the building blogging process.
  4. Virtual Tumbleweed Contest - Top 10 Finalists - Our fans are some super creative folks! Check out our latest Pinterest contest and get some ideas to personalize your own tiny house.
We've got a lot more great posts coming your way. We are grateful for our many quests bloggers and look forward to sharing the best information we can to help you get started on your own tiny house. Grab your own tiny house plans here.         

Written by Brett Torrey Haynes — July 20, 2012

Filed under: Build it yourself   Downsizing   floor plans   green building   home plans  

Tiny House = Tiny Office


We are very excited to be to owners of the Tumbleweed Tiny House that was part of the Small Worlds exhibition at the wonderful Toledo Museum of Art and we are thrilled to have helped the early childhood programming at the Museum. 

 
The Andersons and The Lathrop Company did an amazing job building and outfitting the Tiny House. Everyone involved at the Museum and Lathrop made the pick-up easy, painless and a joy.
 
I first saw a blurb about the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company on the internet back in the early 2000’s and immediately became a fan and began secretly dreaming of owning one. I started following the company website and researching other small houses. 
 
My family and I desire and seek simplicity, a mark of every Tumbleweed Tiny House. For us, however, this simplicity seems difficult to achieve in these busy days with 2 small children, 2 dogs, and regular gatherings of family and friends in our home, all of which unfortunately do not lend themselves to life in our new Tiny House. 
 
So, because living in our Tiny House is not at option at this point in our lives, we are happy that we now have a cozy, new office out of which to work. Our new Tiny House is now residing at Developer Town here in Indianapolis, IN. Developer Town is pretty amazing on its own. Software entrepreneurs work in mobile garden sheds inside a giant warehouse that was more or less abandoned. The warehouse is located on the Monon Trail, a great rail-to-trail in Indy that connects downtown to the Northern suburbs. 

The good folks at Developer Town allowed us to move in, set up and get to work. We are grateful to be there and excited to see what is next. We love our Tiny House and look forward to sharing it with our family and friends in the years to come.






The new owner of the XS-House wishes to remain anonymous. 

Written by Bridget Thornton — June 13, 2012

Filed under: home plans   house-to-go   small house   xshouse  

What a week on the lot!

Here's an update from our friends over at Boneyard Studios:

I left for Brazil just as everything started happening on the lot.  I promised I wouldn’t disappear for a month but try and stay engaged in the project while here.  Thus, I write this from a hammock in rural Northeast Brazil where we’re staying with an amazing community leader and learning about the Xukuru’s fight to regain their territory here in Brazil.  While feeling grateful for the opportunity to be here, I’m also sad that I’m missing out on all the work that is being done on the lot.  Fortunately, Tony and Brian have been keeping me updated via photos, email and Skype.

Here’s a recent update I received from Tony about the past week:

What a week!  We took delivery of the shipping container on Monday, we’ve set most of the fence posts and Brian and Jay picked up their trailers on Friday.  We should have the fencing up by the end of next week and, hopefully, we’ll have your house on the lot in about a week.  You’re not gonna recognize the place when you get back! 
 
It took some doing to get the trailers on the lot, but everything went well and we learned a lot about the logistics of moving and siting them.  Once they are built up, it’s going to be even trickier to move them around.  There’s not enough room in the alley to back them all the way into place with a truck.  We ended up situating them by hand.  We’re going to look into getting some type of hand dolly for future use.  And I wouldn’t be surprised if we end up renting a small tractor to move them on and off the lot.  One nice thing about the lot is that the yard slopes down perfectly to meet the back of the trailer.  You’ll probably be able to step out of your back door directly onto the grass without stairs.    

Brian and I have spoken to a lot of people passing through the alley and the feedback we’re getting is very positive.  People are excited about the garden beds and curious about tiny houses. I know you feel like you’re missing out, but a lot of what we’ve been doing is dirty, sweaty grunt work.  The good news is that we should be ready for the fun part of designing and building out the interior of yours when you get back.       

Check out the photos below – they’ve really made progress, and I’m excited to get back and start working on this project again!


Head over to Barnyard Studios to see the rest of the pictures.

Written by Brett Torrey Haynes — June 05, 2012

Filed under: Build it yourself   floor plans   green building   green home   home design   home plans   See a tiny house  

Powering Our Tiny House


One of the most common questions we are asked is how  did we set up the electricity in our tiny house. I’ll be the first to admit that I am not that familiar with all the technical aspects of our system so here is what we said about it on our blog:

“We designed the solar for our cabin by first minimizing our needs - energy hogs like electric stoves, fridges, washer / dryer, air conditioning, water heaters, microwaves and such were ruled out. Our system provides lights, small fans, and plugs for small appliances. When we need to run construction tools or other items with large power needs, we use a portable generator. The generator can also recharge the batteries if we need it to.”

We both work from our tiny house. I use a laptop computer which probably draws the most power. Matt is able to do most of his work from a tablet which uses a lot less energy to run.  


We don’t have a traditional refrigeration system. We did find a great invention called the Coleman Stirling Engine Cooler that was used by long haul truckers and boaters. Coleman doesn’t make them any more. Even at its coldest setting it draws very little power. We don’t use it as our primary cooling source, however. We set it on freeze and put ice packs inside which we then transfer to a regular cooler.  We also changed the way we buy and eat food. We bought into a CSA and we make frequent trips to the farmer’s market to get fresher ingredients that we use faster.  


We also didn’t install the recommended propane fueled boat heater in our tiny house. We live in the southern Appalachian Mountains and during the summer it will never get cold enough to need it. For now, we don’t plan to live in our tiny house over the winter months because we’ll take that time to travel and see family in other parts of the country. 

Next time, I’ll share our water systems and how we have a pressurized shower without any indoor plumbing.  


Written by Laura LaVoie — June 04, 2012

Filed under: Build it yourself   green building   green home   home design   home plans   Power Station   small house   solar home  

Download Study Plans

Our FREE study plans give you the opportunity to discuss your dreams with an architect or your local building department. The Study Plans give you enough information to talk price and sizes. We've also added material cost estimates for all our homes.

To download, please click on the image below

Written by Steve Weissmann — October 20, 2010

Filed under: Build it yourself   home plans   house plan  
Tumbleweed Tiny House Company
bodega loring nv
harbinger Whidbey sebastarosa
enesti b53 zglass

Recent Posts

Categories

Recent Comments


Free Catalog

Customer Showcase

Amish Barn Raiser

Tumbleweed Trailer

Take a Video Tour