Cross "Trailer" Off Your Build List

Although we're in the throes of winter, it's already time to start planning for tiny house builds this spring.

Would you like to cross "trailer" off your build list? To save hundreds of hours of preparation and ensure a safe foundation for your home, then take a look at Tumbleweed trailers developed specifically for tiny houses.

Trailers come in all home sizes

Our trailers are available in 18, 20 and 24 foot lengths and work well for full porches (like Elm, Linden models) or corner porches (like Cypress models). The trailers include brakes, lights, underside flashing and special trailer radial tires - and four scissor-leveling jacks are also provided.

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Written by Debby Richman — January 24, 2014

Filed under: Build it yourself   house-to-go   Tumbleweed trailer  

Workshops Produce New Tiny House Experts!

When people attend tiny house workshops, they begin by introducing themselves and their reasons for wanting to go tiny. Sometime earlier they had discovered tiny houses and tiny dwellers online, and been inspired by the possibilities of a house-on-wheels. Now they are spending time with tiny experts and other like-minded people in person, and the reality of going tiny seems within reach.

At Tumbleweed Tiny House Company, we are thrilled to watch the co-mingling during workshops. Afterwards, the entire tiny house community cheers as new tinies get built and people transform into experts! Here are three people who have become tiny living influencers and leaders in their own rights. 


Brittany Yunker sitting next to her Bayside Bungalow
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Written by Debby Richman — December 17, 2013

Filed under: brittany   building   ella   guillaume   house-to-go   workshops  

Gina's Little House


There is nothing sweeter than a tiny house that finds a home. HT to Dee Williams for sharing.

Written by Brett Torrey Haynes — June 20, 2012

Filed under: house-to-go   See a tiny house   small house   video  

Tiny House = Tiny Office


We are very excited to be to owners of the Tumbleweed Tiny House that was part of the Small Worlds exhibition at the wonderful Toledo Museum of Art and we are thrilled to have helped the early childhood programming at the Museum. 

 
The Andersons and The Lathrop Company did an amazing job building and outfitting the Tiny House. Everyone involved at the Museum and Lathrop made the pick-up easy, painless and a joy.
 
I first saw a blurb about the Tumbleweed Tiny House Company on the internet back in the early 2000’s and immediately became a fan and began secretly dreaming of owning one. I started following the company website and researching other small houses. 
 
My family and I desire and seek simplicity, a mark of every Tumbleweed Tiny House. For us, however, this simplicity seems difficult to achieve in these busy days with 2 small children, 2 dogs, and regular gatherings of family and friends in our home, all of which unfortunately do not lend themselves to life in our new Tiny House. 
 
So, because living in our Tiny House is not at option at this point in our lives, we are happy that we now have a cozy, new office out of which to work. Our new Tiny House is now residing at Developer Town here in Indianapolis, IN. Developer Town is pretty amazing on its own. Software entrepreneurs work in mobile garden sheds inside a giant warehouse that was more or less abandoned. The warehouse is located on the Monon Trail, a great rail-to-trail in Indy that connects downtown to the Northern suburbs. 

The good folks at Developer Town allowed us to move in, set up and get to work. We are grateful to be there and excited to see what is next. We love our Tiny House and look forward to sharing it with our family and friends in the years to come.






The new owner of the XS-House wishes to remain anonymous. 

Written by Bridget Thornton — June 13, 2012

Filed under: home plans   house-to-go   small house   xshouse  

Water in Our Tiny House

Last week I talked about our off the grid electrical system. This week I wanted to share a little with you about how we live without plumbing in our tiny house.

We decided to skip any of the plumbing in our small space for a few reasons. We currently use water from two sources. We have spring on the land and we collect that water in four 5 gallon containers usually about once a week. We use this water for washing.  We have a Berkey water filtration system in our house which sits over a basin that we use as our indoor “sink” for brushing teeth, washing hands and other small cleaning jobs like our mugs in the morning.  Our second source is to purchase our drinking water by the gallon. 

It isn’t uncommon for an American household to use 100 gallons of water or more a day. This sort of statistic has always bothered me, especially since much of that water is essentially wasted. We leave our sinks on when we brush our teeth or wash our dishes. We stand in the shower for a half an hour at a time. We use flush toilets. In our tiny house we use probably around 3 gallons a day, and that is a high estimate. (This does not include drinking water).  We have elevated much of our water consumption by building a dry composting toilet as recommended. We did the research and read the Humanure Handbook and realized this was a great solution for us. Our gray water can be taken care of by constructing an artificial wetland. 

We are most proud of our shower system. We came up with the design after Matt went out to New Mexico to learn how to do Earth Bag building so we could begin a project in South Africa. The man he met with had lived on a boat and explained that he used a garden sprayer for his shower. We realized that this was a great idea and thought we could make a few improvements. Using parts from the plumbing department we turned a simple garden sprayer into a 4 gallon pressurized shower system.  We were even able to take this design and build something similar for the children we are working with in South Africa.
Eventually we plan to build a rain catchment system and we hope to eventually eliminate the need to purchase our drinking water. People have asked us if the tradeoff is worth it, and I don’t find the way we live any more difficult than before. We simply traded some inconveniences for others. Living in this tiny house has given us a lot of freedom to do things we weren’t able to do living in a city.  I’m inspired by seeing all the creative and wonderful people who have embraced the tiny life and I am proud to be a part of this small but growing movement. 
Laura LaVoie and her husband live full-time in their Tumbleweed and blog about their experience at Life in 120 Square Feet. If you want to learn more about building a tiny house, join us at a workshop near you

Written by Laura LaVoie — June 12, 2012

Filed under: house-to-go   off-grid   tarleton   water  
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