Tips for Inviting Personality Into Your Home's Interior Design

Our home is our sanctuary for rest and pleasure, and its design is most likely a reflection of our lifestyle and personality. If the look of your home hasn't changed for decades, you may be stuck in a rut. Do you play it safe with neutral colors and low-key decor? Perhaps you're the type of person who prefers to stay within a comfort zone. Invite excitement and unpredictability into your life by starting with some home improvements and design updates. Similar to our wardrobe and hobbies, updating our home can have a positive effect on our mental, emotional and spiritual health.

Take risks and stay fresh by adopting any of the following interior-design ideas:

Eye-Catching Color

Transforming the energy of your home doesn't have to be an expensive renovation project, and your walls don't have to be the only source of bright and stylish color. Accent a subdued wall with bold and colorful accents. Grommet curtains in colors jonquil, azalea or currant add character to white or beige walls. You can also play up your drapery with fun patterns and prints. Home decor store Z Gallerie offers Venetian Blue and Citrus Grey panels in a variety of geometric shapes that create a contemporary appearance. Minor room accents in bold hues can also instantly and easily give a home personality. Pair couches, sofas and sitting chairs with throw pillows in an orange geometric pattern or grey, orange and turquoise contemporary print available on Etsy.com.

Opposites Attract

Unexpected design choices and pairings can create an interior space that's anything but ordinary. Live life outside the rules and make life more interesting by marrying two unlikely design elements into a contrasting, yet stunning interior-design theme. Envision a modernistic style with retro accents. Pair antique furnishings with luxury furniture. Imagine an elegant design theme decorated with DIY crafts.

MiamiHerald.com recommends the design advice of Emily Chalmers, author of "Contemporary Country" and "Modern Vintage Style." In "Modern Vintage Style," Chalmers is an advocate of mixing old and new elements as well as looking for opportunities to "restore, reinvent and rescue."

As you juxtapose design contrasts, strive for balance. Chalmers suggests using artifacts and old-fashion pieces in conjunction with more modern and refined elements. Light fixtures and textiles are excellent options for adding dimension to the design of a room. From mid-century modern floor lamps and Victorian wall sconces to Oriental floor rugs and elaborate tablecloths, a wide variety of lighting and textile options can serve as excellent contrasting design accessories.

Natural Instincts

Home remodeling and design platform Houzz.com suggests designing your home by following your heart and speaking to your soul. Most importantly, don't be afraid to execute a design theme or decorative idea because it's too outrageous or eccentric. Design theme rooms to reflect your interests and passions. Are you a sentimental person? Create a nostalgic room adorned with family photos, achievements and heirlooms. Do you enjoy the tranquility of being at the beach? Transform a special space into a beachy nook with picturesque outdoor wall art and sea-inspired ornaments. With a little introspection, you can explore your inner creativity and then approach your interior space as a blank canvas for personal, aesthetic self-expression.

Written by Guest Blogger — January 18, 2013

Filed under: design   guest blogger   Houses   tips  

Tour a Fencl in Colorado!

Don’t hesitate to jump on this opportunity to see a perfectly built Tumbleweed! Our talented builders in Colorado Springs have a freshly finished Fencl available for potential buyers to tour and view. To make arrangements weekdays between 8am and 5pm, just call first to make sure someone is there.

A Beautiful Fencl
This Fencl could be yours! Click here

The location is 2108 Victor Place, Colorado Springs,Colorado 80915, and they can be reached at (855) 590-7433.

This Tumbleweed is ready to roll, with conduit prepared for your solar wiring, propane tanks, and a 30 gallon fresh water holding tank. The floor is finished in cork, and the RV furnace and spray in polyurethane insulation are ready to take on the coldest weather. Please enjoy touring this beautifully made Fencl - even if you’re interested in a differentTumbleweed model. It's so beautiful it probably won't be available to the public all that long, and seeing a tiny house in real life can do wonders in terms of helping fans figure out which model they prefer and how they’d like to use their space.

Want to see more images? Click here

Written by Pepper Clark — January 10, 2013

Filed under: builders   colorado   colorado springs   fencl for sale   Houses   new   open house   See a tiny house  

But won't someone STEAL my tiny house on wheels?

THE THREE QUESTIONS I MOST OFTEN GET WHILE HOSTING TINY HOUSE-BUILDING WORKSHOPS....
-But where are tiny houses allowed?
-Where do you go to the bathroom? (toilet/facility set-ups)
-Won't someone steal your tiny house on wheels?


The first two have been covered many times over on several blogs, ranging from tinyhouseblog.com to tinyhousetalk.comtinyhousedesign.com and  thetinylife.com, but I rarely see any attention given to the theft question.
Below is part of a response comment I left on Kent Griswold's blog, with much other info I have now added....

A lot of people always bring up the "won't people steal it" question, but its not as likely to happen as people might think, in fact, I've personally not heard of a case yet. 
Hopefully this will give some a bit of comfort...as we've talked a bit about it at each of the Tumbleweed Workshops I've hosted, and my own workshops....(again, there's one coming up Nov 2-4 in Boston, where we'll all build a tiny dwelling together). kidcedar at gmail dot com for info. 

PREVENTATIVE MEASURES, and the "WHY NOT".... 


-First, with a heavy duty chain you can simply lock it (your tiny house) down to a tree or two, making it very time consuming and difficult to steal. One could also self-boot it (perhaps even remove the tire(s) from one side (simple to do) so that it can't be easily transported). Most thieves want the quick steal, and not something that requires an hour or so of tree felling, and multiple people, to acquire.

-Secondly, a thief, unless he/she had ample time to hide something so enormous and strip it, would be driving around sticking out like a sore thumb with any form of tiny house- structures which are still very much so huge novelties in the general scheme of things to those not familiar with the scene. I know of many people who have never even heard of the concept, never mind seen a tiny house on wheels. Anyway, if you stole a tiny house, where are you going to hawk it without being noticed, and remembered, by every person you pass? It'd be like stealing a ferris wheel- the down-low factor is terrible, making it almost impossible to resell. 

-Third Tactic....if you plan on leaving it permanently at a site (or for a prolonged period), and have the means, why not just shove a few large boulders in front of, or around it, with a bulldozer? Any tiny-house burglar would now have to have access and the foresight to bring a bulldozer to the scene of the crime, to remove those rocks so as to give the tiny house a free passageway. Thats A LOT of work, and noisy work, to steal ANYTHING. Yeah, a tiny house is very valuable, but this ain't "The Thomas Crown Affair".

-Number Four- When I was in my teens I toured with a pop-punk/rock band by the name of "Rail" from Rochester, NY (Ringing Ear Records). When staying at a motel, especially in a shady area, we'd back the loading doors of a van or U-haul against a wall. Why? The theory is, if they don't have enough room to swing open the doors to steal all the larger gear that can only be unloaded through those very doors, then the gear just can't be removed. Now apply that to a tiny house, but in a slightly different way: If you can't hitch up a tiny house, you can't tow if off the scene. To employ this method, you'd have to unhitch the tiny house, then winch it, tongue-first, into a tight spot (the trailer neck/hitch end). Now, ultimately, its going to take some hard "unwinching" work to get the house into a free and clear spot, where it could then be hitched up tp a vehicle and stolen. Most thieves just aren't going to bother.

Five- Fake cameras- I talk about this in my tiny house design/concept book "Humble Homes, Simple Shacks". Basically, hang a fake camera somewhat near the tiny house, high up on a pole or tree for instance, but somewhere in clear view. This sounds goofy, but beneath it, tack a small, official looking sign that simply reads "#5". In reality you only have one camera hung, and its a cheap fake one (they sell kits- see below), but by having it numbered "#5", any prospective "hooligan" is going to think twice before doing anything stupid or illegal near your site. He or she will be thinking, "If this is camera #5, then there must be at least four others, and how many of these have I been captured on already!?". Again, its simple and goofy, but its not going to hurt. A sign on the door of your cabin reading, "I hope you smiled for our seven cameras" might work too.

And there are a few sample ideas, and some reasoning as to why its just less likely that someone is going to steal your tiny house anyway. 

Vandalism is a whole other beast, but any homeowner, or seasonable cabin dweller, has to face this same problem.

Derek "Deek" Diedricksen is the mastermind behind Relaxshacks.com and is the author of 'Humble Homes, Simple Shacks'. Deek also hosts Tumbleweed Tiny House Workshops around the country.

Written by Derek Diedricksen — August 28, 2012

Filed under: general   Houses   off-grid   workshops  

13 Ways a Tiny House Can Save You $378 a Month or More


This post is going to show you 13 ways that you can save $378 or more by living in a tiny house. And that’s just the beginning because some families are saving much more than that but for now, let’s get right into it.

1. Little to no mortgage

Making the decision to build a tiny house on a trailer so that you can live in means you most likely won’t have a mortgage. Actually, banks don’t normally finance little homes like this even though they will help you with an RV most of the time. We’ll see if someday we can easily finance our tiny houses on trailers. Even if you could somehow manage to get a 30 year mortgage on a tiny house, it would only cost you $366 a month if you had to pay 7% interest, had no money to put down, and you paid $55,000 for it. This would obviously mean that you did not do any of the labor yourself. Not too bad, right? It gets better...

2. Miniscule heating and cooling bills

I’m not sure what you currently pay for your utilities but I think you’ll be impressed with how efficient a little home is. Most people having to heat or cool their tiny homes pay just $10 to $35 a month for all of their utilities. Most people that I know pay an average of $120 a month for utilities, but it can easily be much more.

3. Easy and relatively cheap to build

Costs for materials for the average tiny house on a trailer that’s less than 200 square feet is about $21,000 if you buy everything new through a retail store like Home Depot or Lowe’s. This, of course, does not include labor for anything you don’t feel comfortable doing. You can always attend a Tumbleweed workshop to prepare yourself for your first project. Later, we’ll talk about how much you can save using reclaimed materials.

4. You don’t have to buy your own land

It turns out that most people who’ve built and now live in their own tiny house end up working something out with someone who already owns land. In these situations you can either pay a little bit of rent (as little as $100 a month) or exchange a service for your stay. You can provide care for an elderly person or labor for a small farm. Or you can simply park in a friend or family members rural backyard. And when the time comes to move, you don’t have to worry about land ownership.

5. Park it in your backyard and rent out your big house

If you’re lucky enough to already live in a location where you can park a tiny house on a trailer or an RV- or maybe you can build on a foundation as a shed, pool house, cabana, guest house, or accessory structure- you can start your project right away, or look for the right property to buy. 

6. No more high rent or mortgage payments

I don’t know about you, but I pay about $900 every month in rent as I write this. That’s $32,400 every three years. I wouldn’t mind parting with that, or at least turning it into something I can own free and clear someday. Some of you pay less, and some of you pay more but either way it’s one of our largest expenses. If you’re paying a mortgage do you think you could rent your house out and cover all of your costs, if you wanted to? This way you’d turn your current home into an asset that pays itself off while you live mortgage-free in a tiny house. Now that would be smart, wouldn’t it?

7. You can use reclaimed materials to build your tiny home for cheap

I’ve talked to people who have built their own tiny house on a trailer for as little as $3,500 because they took the time to find free or cheap reclaimed materials like doors, wood, windows, siding, and more. It can save you a lot of money up front to dedicate an extra two or three months just for finding the right materials to suit your design. It also helps to be open to changing your design as you find cool stuff to use for your build. Whether you end up spending $16,000, $7,200, or just $5,700, you’ll have a one-of-a-kind home that’s fully paid for!

8. You can do the labor yourself

There are now several stories out there of everyday people, like you and me, with no previous carpentry experience, building their own tiny houses. Many of them end up recruiting the help of friends and family and others hire help when they need it (like for plumbing and wiring, for example). If you’re new to construction or just the idea of building tiny and/or on a trailer, you might want to consider one of Tumbleweed’s tiny house workshops.

9. No space for oversized and overpriced furniture

In a tiny or small house, there’s only so much room for furniture. Most people who are living tiny just have a couch (usually built in), a bed, entertainment center, and a table. That’s about it. There’s also built in bookshelves, closets, and other storage. That means you’ll never really see that Rooms to Go bill again just to fill all of that space in an oversized house, condo, or apartment. You won’t need a huge dining set, side tables, and an enormous desk, either.

10. No space for constant new clothes

Living small usually means cutting down on your wardrobe. In a tiny house, studio, or even in most apartments there’s just not that much closet space. Especially if you share the place with someone else. In a tiny house, there’s only room for what you love and personally, I like that. If you love your clothes, you can always adjust your design or choose one of Tumbleweed’s tiny house plans that includes the right amount of closet and storage space for you. But the point is that in a tiny home you’re less likely to go buy new clothes every forty days or whatever. Instead, you’ll probably buy a few really nice, high quality outfits that you really love wearing (you know, your favorites). That’s what I do to stay happy with less clothes (but I’m a guy, so what do I know).

11. Less repair and maintenance costs over time

Owning less means dealing with less. Isn’t that nice? So over time you’re going to save on all kinds of repair costs in money, time, and stress. Need to paint the house again? No big deal. Time for a new roof? No problem. Need to fix something? That should be pretty simple (especially if you were the one who built it, right?).

12. Less room for children

This is my least favorite money saving benefit because I love children. And when I’m older, I probably won’t be able to live in a tiny house anymore for this reason alone. But for those of you who don’t want kids, or already have them, it’ll save you money either way which leads us to the next, and last, money saving benefit for living in a smaller home.

13. Less storage space for excessive children’s toys and gadgets

Most kids who live in small spaces end up find creative ways to meet their needs instead of depending on the latest and trendiest toys and gadgets which can get really expensive for parents. These kids tend to play outside more and interact with other kids. But maybe with all of the money you save on everything else, you can afford to buy the family an iPad for everyone to play with! My niece and nephews love this thing more than most of their toys because of all the available interactive games you can play on it and it hardly takes up any space in your house.

If all of the above adds up to a savings of just $378 a month for you, you would end up with an extra $13,608 in your pocket after only three years. But I believe that most of you would get to save a lot more than just $378 a month by moving into a tiny house. The main challenge is coming up with the money to build it or buy it up front or getting financing for it. But if you look around, you might find that you can come up with enough money to start by letting go of some of the possessions you have around you. Just maybe, because not all of us have that option. But if you wanted to, could you? Would it be fair to your family? If not, then don’t. Your family is more important than saving money. Maybe you can ease them into the idea over time instead.

But the fact is that most of you can save a lot more than $378 a month by downsizing in some way. One young family, who I won’t name, is getting to save an entire full-time salary by moving from their big house to a tiny one that they built mortgage-free. They’re getting to put away at least $1,745 a month, but probably more.

Can you imagine that? That equals to $62,820 after just three years time. Wouldn’t you agree that that could be very powerful for an individual as well as a young family? That’s how to get ahead relatively fast. With that kind of money, you can buy a more comfortable home for a growing family, start your own business, pay for an education, or pay off your debt completely in just a few years.

Alex Pino promotes tiny houses and other small spaces through Tiny House Talk. He currently lives in a 600 square foot apartment and has been downsizing since 2007. In the summer of 2012, he’s going to be traveling through the United States after pairing down to what fits in a backpack.

Written by Alex Pino — May 14, 2012

Filed under: Downsizing   Houses   Resources   small house  

See A Day in the Life of Dee


You will love this video of Dee Williams, produced by the National Building Museum for their "House and Home" exhibit. If you are planning to go to the Santa Fe workshop, Dee will be showing the video and letting you in on all the behind-the-scenes goodness. Why not join us in Santa Fe?

Written by Brett Torrey Haynes — April 27, 2012

Filed under: Build it yourself   Houses   Media  
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