Buying Flooring was super easy. There’s a local company that sells excellent hardwood, and they have a discount center in Tillsonburg where they offer small amounts super cheaply. My friend who lives in Tilsonburg has offered to pick it up and delivery it to the school. Breezewood forest products http://www.woodfloorsdirect.ca/ I was able to get 213 square feet of hemlock, and another 60 of locust. The hemlock is like pine. Farmers sometimes use it for their barn floors.

It will be perfect for the downstairs. Locust is very hard, and I’ll use it in the loft. No one will be able to walk around up there, and the mattress will cover most of the floor, so it is a waste to have such a hard wood, but it will be lovely. The wood only cost $1.00 a square foot. I’ll have to stain the wood, but that shouldn’t be a big problem.

Written by Kitchener Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational School — April 30, 2010

Filed under: Houses  

Buying Windows

Buying windows Well, it’s not easy.

There are a bazillion companies each touting their own product.  I ended up using Golden Windows because I’m familiar with the product.  I’ve got a room full of those windows at home and they’re lovely.  I choose to go with casements, and because I’m cheap, I went with the vinyl clad inside and out. I know the wood interior trim would look spectacular, but I can’t justify the cost and since I’m thinking of painting the interior rather than leaving it knotty pine, I’m pretty sure the white trim will look okay. http://www.goldenwindows.com/ Harold, the salesguy, was wonderful. He was easy to talk to and he guided me through the process.

Some of the fencl windows are a bit smaller than standard windows, so going custom is necessary.   For the front bay window, companies don’t seem to carry the 15 “ windows, (even custom). I opted to go with a double casement instead.  This is the side that will face the lake and that’s where th e prevailing winds come from so it’s really important that these windows open.  It might not look quite as cute as the windows in Jay’s fencl, but I’m confident they’ll look good.  I was happy to buy local, and unlike the big box stores, they’ll deliver in 10 days.  Bonus.

Written by Kitchener Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational School — April 19, 2010

Filed under: Houses  

KCI's construction students

There are three classes that will be working on KCI's Fencl.  Two are construction classes and one is a cabinet making class. These are just a few of the students in the classes.  They're viewing construction videos, and writing some tests on important construction techniques and safety codes.

Written by Kitchener Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational School — March 13, 2010

Filed under: Houses  

Inside Ben and Sabrina's Enesti

In 2008, Ben and Sabrina built a modified version of the Enesti. Take a look inside.

Written by Steve Weissmann — January 25, 2010

Filed under: Houses  

Finish this tiny house yourself


Lusby for Sale

Last year I was inspired Jay's beautiful Tumbleweed houses and wanted to follow in his footsteps. I attended his workshop and bought plans for the Lusby. Not being handy myself, I hired a professional builder of custom homes to build the exterior of my tiny house. Its home was to be on a perfectly picturesque New Hampshire lake. I put my traditional, 4 bedroom home on the market and waited... and waited...and waited. Not even one offer did I get, even after dropping with price by a third. With three kids in college, I couldn't afford to keep holding on to both properties. I sold my lakeside lot and am now selling my tiny house.

It is completed on the exterior; the interior is partially done. Here are the specifications:


House width: 8’

House length: 19’

Trailer Size: 7’ x 18’

Road Height: 13’ 5"

Dry Weight: 8,000 to 10,000 lbs (estimated)

Porch: 7 1/2 ’ x 3’

Main Room: 6 1/2 ’ x 6 1/2 ’

Kitchen: In main room

Bathroom: 3’ x 6’

Loft height: 3’ 8"

Ceiling height: 6’ 3" (All measurements are approximate.)

The following features are currently a part of the tiny house:

1. shingled roof

2. cedar siding (painted)

3. exterior front door (African Mahogany with glass center panel)

4. pet door for cat or small dog

5. 3 windows and screens on each long side

6. loft windows (cannot open)

7. fiberglass shower

8. electric wiring

9. cable TV wiring These items are included with the house but are not installed.

Many are still in original shipping cartons.

1. 2 interior doors (African Mahogany)

2. antique style brass door knobs

3. stained glass inserts for loft windows plus extra piece that could be fastened to the front door

4. tiny toilet

5. bathroom pedestal sink with porcelain faucets

6. living room, bathroom and bedroom

7. handmade Cape Code lantern style porch lights

8. stainless kitchen sink (faucet not included)

9. kitchen sink cabinet

10. recycled jeans batt insulation (more is needed)

11. electric water heater, 10 gallon

12. wood stove, stainless steel enclosure and chimney pipe

What is not finished?

* the interior walls (drywall) and finish trim are not in

* interior doors are included but not installed

* finish flooring is not included

* lighting fixtures need to be installed after drywall is in

* porch lights need to be installed

* outlets and light switches are not included

* wood stove needs to be installed

* plumbing and kitchen fixtures need to be installed

* kitchen cabinet for sink needs to be installed (and more cabinets need to be purchased for rest of kitchen)

* kitchen appliances are not included

* stained glass inserts for loft windows need to be installed

* insulation is not complete

* ladder to loft is not included

* closets have not been built

The tiny house is currently in southern New Hampshire. You are welcome to come and pick it up or I'll help you find a company to bring it to you.


Written by Steve Weissmann — June 15, 2009

Filed under: Houses  

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