Miranda's Hearth - Tiny House Build Spot in New England

Calling all creative entrepreneurs, artists/makers, and tiny house enthusiasts,

I am in the process of starting Miranda’s Hearth, the first community art hotel, a business where everything in the rooms from the soap to the furniture to the dishes are handmade by members of the community. Our mission is to build a community through creativity that is approachable, accessible, and affordable to people of all professions.

In the long term, our goal is to transform an underutilized piece of public property into a hub for creative economy, an educational resource, and a retreat for makers and patrons. By employing makers to build and run Miranda’s Hearth, we will accomplish the parallel goals of providing local jobs that keep young professionals engaged in the community while developing a focal point where people can gather and create.

Currently, we are in our second year of running monthly Dinner, Art, and Music nights which regularly draw 30-50 people and have engaged over 200 individual patrons. Rather than following the “build it and they will come” model, we are bringing our community together so that they can help us build the community art hotel from the ground up.

In 2014, we co-hosted the BIG Tiny House Festival with the Somerville Arts Council and when nearly 2,000 people showed up, we knew that we needed to further engage that community by asking them to help us build our own. We plan to start this spring by building a tiny house of roughly 115 sq ft that will become the first hotel room. This tiny house, filled with local handmade items, will create an affordable preliminary space to host events, showcase our business plan, and engage the community.

Currently, we are looking for a building location in New England, preferably within an hour or two of Boston. For six months to a year, we will need roughly the space of two parking spots as well as a secure location to store tools. We are looking into locations at both private residencies and businesses.

For private residences, we could exchange a small amount of rent in addition to assisting with yard work, child care, etc. For businesses, we could help with administration, use our growing network to market your services, and host exciting creative events. We are also looking for a longer term parking location while we continue to develop plans for the fully realized hotel.

If you have a space or know of someone who might, please contact us via email at mirandashearth@gmail.com or via phone at 978-233-1423. We would also love to hear any questions, ideas, or suggestions you might have regarding the tiny house or the community art hotel.

To keep updated on our progress, you can join our email list at mirandashearth.com, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, or come to one of our Dinner, Art, + Music nights every Second Sunday.

We look forward to seeing you at Miranda’s Hearth!

Miranda Aisling

Founder of Miranda’s Hearth 

Written by Guest Blogger — February 10, 2015

Filed under: Art Hotel   Miranda Aisling   New England   Tiny home   Tiny House  

Off-Grid Heating: Propane VS. Wood Burning

If you are looking to heat your tiny home with an off-grid heater, the two big power players are 1). PROPANE and 2). WOOD BURNING, but there are advantages and disadvantages to both. Let's compare the most popular off-grid heaters for tiny house RVs: the Dickinson Marine P9000 and the Kimberly Wood Stove

1). PROPANE: Dickinson Marine P9000

The Dickinson has been the leader in tiny house heating for some time because of its sleek look and compact size.

Advantages:

  • Space Saving. This tiny heater can be installed directly into your wall. The body of the unit is only 8.5" wide x 14" high x 5.5" deep. 
  • Affordable. Off-grid appliances, especially those made for boats, are expensive. The Dickinson P9000 is $1145.15, including the chimney. Cost of fuel is not included.
  • Beauty. No one can deny that this is a good looking appliance. The glass door allows you to watch the flames flicker as the heater warms your tiny space. 
  • Venting. Can be vented through the wall or ceiling.
  • Lightweight. Weight is always an important consideration when it comes to tiny house RVs. 

Christopher Smith from the film TINY installing his Dickinson in his Colorado tiny home. Photo credit here.

Disadvantages:

  • Fuel Expense: This stove burns 1 pound of propane every 5-7 hours. A 20 pound propane tank will cost about $15-20 to refill. Depending on your climate, this can be a huge expense.
  • Running Constantly Not Possible: This stove needs to be used under supervision. Which means turning it off while you sleep or when you leave the house may cause your home to return to a frigid temperature, depending on your choice of insulation.
  • Fan Requires 12v: Wiring needed for the fan to spin and heat to circulate.
  • Lower BTUs: Depending on where you are located, this heater may not be enough. On HIGH the heat output is 4,500 BTUs.
  • Doesn't Dehumidify: Propane stove tops produce excessive moisture, which can be difficult to maintain in a tiny space. If you already have a propane stove planned for your tiny home RV, you might want to purchase a dehumidifier or use a heat source that acts as a dehumidifier. Wood stoves will dehumidify as well as heat, where as the Dickinson will not act as a dehumidifier. *As a note, the Dickinson will not produce extra moisture because it is a vented appliance.

Brittany's Bayside Bungalow with the Dickinson in her Washington state tiny home. Photo credit: Chris Tack

2). WOOD STOVE: Kimberly by Unforgettable Fire, LLC

The Kimberly is compact, burns extremely clean for a wood burning stove and vents through the floor, making it the most popular choice for tiny home owners who prefer wood burning heat. 

The Kasl family heating their Minnesota tiny home with the Kimberly

Advantages:

  • Dehumidifier: Wood burning stoves act as dehumidifiers, which is a good thing for tiny spaces that often struggle with moisture control.
  • Fuel Cost: Wood is easily obtainable and if you have your own wooded property, it can be free. Also check Craigslist for "free firewood."
  • High BTUs: This wood stove can burn up to 42,200 BTUs. On low, this stove can burn up to 8 hours on a single load of fuel, providing a good night’s sleep without having to refuel. 
  • Beauty: Like the Dickinson, this stove is also very attractive and provides a glass window for fire viewing.
  • Cook top: As an added bonus, you can cook on top of this stove.
  • No additional power needed. This stove is operational without the need for 12V.

Ella & Zach with the Kimberly in their Northern California Tiny Home

Disadvantages:

  • Space Requirement: Although the Kimberly takes up far less space than most wood stoves and allows the use of a 3-inch pellet stove pipe, it will still require more space and clearance than the Dickinson and cannot be installed into the wall.
  • Cost: At $4,495 for the stove, pipe and floor pad, the Kimberly is an investment.
  • Too Much Heat: Depending on your location and climate, this stove might be too much for your tiny space, even when on low. 
  • Weight: The Kimberly weighs 56 pounds, which isn't very heavy for a wood stove but heavier than the Dickinson.
Jenna & Guillaume's Kimberly wood stove in their traveling tiny home

For our tiny home, we went back and forth between the Dickinson and the Kimberly. Eventually we decided on the Kimberly. We plan on taking our tiny home to ski resorts, so an efficient high BTU heat source was necessary. We also have a three burner propane cooktop, so moisture control was a factor in our wood stove decision. The extra money and space requirement was worth it to us. 

YOUR TURN! Which would you prefer for your tiny home: the Dickinson or the Kimberly?

*Other ways to heat your tiny home

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — February 03, 2015

Filed under: best   Dickinson   heat source   heating   heating a tiny house   Kimberly   Marine Stove   propane   Tiny home   Tiny House   Tumbleweed   Wood burning   Wood Stove  

Take The 2015 Tiny House Survey

In order to better support our customers, we're participating in the 2015 Tiny House Survey.  The survey is completely anonymous and we'd love to get your input.  Please see below:

Written by Steve Weissmann — February 02, 2015

The Advantages of Tiny House Dormers

A dormer is a structural element in architecture that protrudes from a sloped roof and allows for additional space. If you're a tiny house enthusiast, the words "additional space" in a tiny house article might seem oxymoronic. Yes, owning a tiny home means that you are "okay" with small spaces, but there is no reason that you should have to sacrifice comfort in your tiny house RV.

So let's learn a little more about dormers and what they could do for your loft. 

A Tumbleweed Elm or Cypress loft WITHOUT dormers (keeping the gable roof line throughout) and a skylight.

Some tiny housers love the coziness and lightweight option of the un-dormered loft (keeping the triangular gable roof line throughout), but most prefer to have a little more headroom. Dormers provide extra space for comfort and additional windows, while keeping the lovely visual aesthetic. 

Tumbleweed Cypress WITHOUT dormers. A lovely gable roof line throughout.

 

Tumbleweed Elm WITH Dormers. Space is gained. The visual aesthetic is not sacrificed. 

How much space do you really gain by having dormers? In order to visualize how much space is actually gained by adding dormers, you will need to have a basic understanding of roof pitch.

Roof pitch is described as the vertical rise divided by the horizontal span of a roof. The gable roof in our Elm and Cypress models have a 12:12 pitch, while our lofts with dormers have a 3:12 pitch. It is important to maintain some roof pitch for weather runoff. 

Examples of roof pitch. Photo credit: Wikipedia

An older Tumbleweed model, where the 3:12 pitch returns to 12:12 for the last few inches of the loft.

If you peer into the back of this older Tumbleweed's loft, you can see where the 3:12 pitch returns to the triangular gable roof line (12:12 pitch). This is a great way to visualize the difference between these two roof pitches. 

If the above loft DID NOT have dormers:

  • The roof pitch would be that triangular slope throughout
  • The four windows that line the sides of the bed would be lost
  • The space on either side of this queen bed would be lost
  • A king bed would not be possible (only possible with dormers)
  • The use of a staircase would be rather difficult (a ladder would most likely be used instead)

Due to costumer feedback, in all of our current models and plans, the dormers extend all the way to the back of the loft. By doing this, the above Tumbleweed loft has gained even more space. Starting this year, we will also include dormer plans with our Elm and Cypress plans, free of charge.
Steve Weissmann (President of Tumbleweed) is 6'2" and can comfortably sit up in bed in this Cypress loft with dormers. 
By adding dormers to your loft, you will also gain valuable wall space, not only on the sides of your loft, but also in the front and back. Consider the cheek walls: the walls that are formed between your dormers and gable roof. Below is a photo of my loft and, as you can see, we've chosen to add an outlet to our cheek wall. My future plan is to mount a television there one day. I could also add a cabinet, shelving, additional lighting or hang decorations / plants / photographs in this additional space. 
Tiny House Giant Journey's loft with dormers. 
So what do you think? Do you want dormers in your tiny house loft?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — January 26, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   Dormers   Elm   Loft   Tiny home   Tiny House   Tiny house Giant Journey   Tumbleweed  

5 Tips for Tiny House Travel

Tiny House GJ traveling through New Brunswick Canada

My Tumbleweed Cypress has rolled all the way from Los Angeles to Nova Scotia to the Florida Keys, where I’m currently writing this blog post. In the four months and 8,000 miles I’ve traveled with a tiny home, I’ve learned a lot through trial and error. Below is a short list I’ve compiled in hopes that it will be helpful to future tiny house travelers.

*Note: A few of the below are also applicable to RVing. That’s intentional. I’ve learned a lot from RVers and many of the same rules are relevant.

5 Tips for Tiny House Travel

1). You can weigh your tiny home at any truck scale. The best way is to weigh the tiny house with your truck attached, then park, detach, weigh your truck alone and subtract that weight from the total. It’s important to know your weight and to have a tow vehicle that can handle the load. It is especially important to be aware of your tongue weight, which can be found by purchasing a tongue scale. Many tiny homes have a heavy tongue weight because of the loft. You can counter balance your tongue weight by placing some of your heavier items in the back of the trailer (like water tanks or solar batteries). You can also use a weight distribution system, like I do.

Tiny House GJ's Weight Distribution System

2). Call campgrounds ahead of time. I call ahead and tell the campground that I have a 24 foot travel trailer that requires 30 amp electrical, water and (if I know my 15 gallon water tank will not be sufficient) a sewage drain for grey water. If they ask for the brand of the travel trailer, I tell them it’s a “Tumbleweed tiny house, you know… like on Tiny House Nation?” And that usually rings a bell. No campground has EVER turned me down. In fact, click here for a list of campgrounds that I’ve stayed at.

Eddie's Tumbleweed in an Austin, TX RV Park

3). Attach bubble levels to your tiny house. I have one on the back center of my house (for left/right leveling) and one on the side (for front/back leveling). I use Anderson levelers for left/right leveling and I LOVE them. With these levelers, I can raise one side of my house up to four inches simply by driving onto them! If I need more than that, I pull one side of my tiny house up onto planks of wood, and then use the levelers. For front/back leveling, I use the tongue jack. Never use the scissor jacks for leveling; They are for stability only.

 Tiny House GJ's Anderson Levelers

4). Get an RV GPS. I use a Rand McNally RV GPS to navigate around low clearances, weight restrictions, propane restrictions, etc. It’s excellent and it is worth its weight in gold for my peace of mind.

5). Secure Loose Items. Add a lip to your shelves and hook & eyes to your drawers. Using a bungie cord works as well, but if every shelf and drawer requires a bungie, you’ll die of tedium. The less “lock and loading” the better. It takes me about 20 minutes to secure everything inside my house and another 20 minutes to pack up the outside. I’ve got it down to a science, but I’m also always improving.

Any travelers out there want to share some of your own tips? Comment below!

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — January 08, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   RV Park   Tiny home   Tiny House   Travel  

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