Do Hobbies and Tiny Spaces Mix?

Will my hobby fit in my future "tiny lifestyle?" The truth is, not all hobbies are suitable to be practiced in a tiny space, but many tiny housers find ways to integrate their passions into their Tiny House RV. Storage for your hobby crafts and gear is also possible with a little creativity. Let's take a look at a few examples. 

Photo credit: Laura & Matt from Life in 120 Square feet

Musical Hobbies

Hanging ukuleles, guitars or violins is a great way to store your musical instrument as a piece of art in your Tiny House RV. If you play a large instrument, such as piano, you will need to integrate enough space for the instrument into your design.

Ella Jenkins designed her Tumbleweed with space in mind for her beloved instruments. In the photo above, you can see her large harp resting as a background focal point while her banjo is stored on the top shelf in the foreground. It can be done!

Art Hobbies 

Are you an artist? Nowadays they make collapsible artist easels that fit perfectly in a tiny space. Try positioning your easel in an area with plenty of windows for natural light, as seen in the Tumbleweed Cypress pictured above.

Miranda is an avid knitter, and she plans on continuing her hobby in her Tumbleweed. Ella makes jewelry. Skyler runs a headband making business out of her Tiny House RV. There are plenty of artistic hobbies that can work in a small space.

Snowboard storage in "Tiny House Giant Journey"

Sports & Exercise

Sports are generally meant to be done outdoors or in an specified arena. That being said, sport equipment can be stored in a Tiny House RV. Some tiny housers even use rock climbing holds on their wall instead of a ladder! Rackets, trekking poles, snorkel masks and fins, can easily be stored or displayed in a small space. I've even seen collapsible kayaks and folding bicycles in Tiny House RVs!

Zack Giffin (Host of Tiny House Nation) uses his Tiny House RV as a mobile ski lodge! His tiny space actually advocates for his hobby! Photo credit of Zack's house.

Some exercise routines are possible in a tiny space, such as: yoga, sit ups, push ups, pulls ups, lunges, squats, etc. For exercise that requires a lot of equipment or maneuvering, a gym membership may be best.

 Mario's Big Screen TV on a Swivel Mount

Digital Entertainment

Who says you can't have a big screen TV in a Tiny House RV? Mario has not one but TWO big screen TVs in his Tumbleweed: a projection screen for the loft and a big screen on a swivel in his great room. You can easily watch football games, host movie nights or play video games in your Tiny House RV with the right entertainment system.

Ariel Canning Pasta Sauce in her Tumbleweed Cypress

Cooking & Food Preserve

If you love cooking and homesteading, you're not alone! Many tiny housers enjoy self sustainability. Ariel has a planted beautiful garden next to her Wyoming based Tumbleweed. She also enjoys canning, drying, pickling and cooks almost all of her own meals.

Ariel cooking in her Tumbleweed Cypress. Photo credit.

Some Hobbies are Made for Big Spaces

As I mentioned before, not all hobbies can fit in a Tiny House RV (or even a large home). For instance, if you're hobby is glass blowing or ballet dancing, you will probably prefer to rent a studio space. If you enjoy raising chickens, fishing and hunting, you should get outdoors.

You don't have to fit everything inside your Tiny House RV. A lot of equipment can be rented, such as: scuba gear, skis, skates, canoes, etc. Purchase art supplies as you need them. Enjoy having the freedom of mobility without clutter and materialism. You can find a way to practice your hobbies, even if that means thinking outside the box!

What is your hobby? Will it fit in a tiny space?

Related article: Do Pets and Tiny Spaces Mix?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about Tiny Homes and their adventure. Follow their informative blog. 

TINY: A Story About Living Small

This inspirational documentary follows Christopher Smith and Merete Mueller as they endeavor to build a 130-square foot home in the Colorado mountains. The film is a wonderful representation of the construction experience from the point of view of the dreamer and novice. As some of you may know, I am currently building a modified Cypress, so TINY hit close to home (quite literally) for me.  My heart reached out to the couple as they struggled and cheered when they overcame defeat. Last week I was even lucky enough to chat with Merete about her build - the good and the bad.

Photo Credit: Kevin Hoth

“We made so many mistakes.” Merete recalled with a chuckle. “We bought windows that we thought were vertical, and proceeded to design the house around them, only to learn six months later that they were actually horizontal windows!”

When I asked how her and Christopher coped with the mishaps, she responded with ease: “One of the great things about building it together is that we could be each others cheerleaders.” Merete says her and Christopher will never get rid of their tiny abode. The difficulty in the experience only strengthened their connection to the home. “It's almost like having a child - a really large child,” Merete joked. 

Photo credit: Merete Mueller

TINY is also a wonderful visual documentation of the growing tiny house community. With Christopher and Merete’s build serving as the backbone, the film periodically cuts away to tour small shelters all across the country or to interview several builders and families who have chosen to downsize. Even a few tiny house legends make an appearance to share their stories. 

“Christopher and I were originally introduced to tiny houses from a magazine article about Dee Williams. It was really cool to meet her in person. When we interviewed her for the film, we were in the middle of our build, and she acknowledged that and encouraged us to keep going.” Dee is now currently on tour for her new book: The Big Tiny.

Merete also remembers getting a lot of blank stares three years ago when her and Christopher began construction,“We all hear the word "home" but we don't always know what that is, or how to get there. Tiny houses, for me, served as a lens on how to explore the question: What really makes a house a home?“ 

 

Photo credit: Merete Mueller

After watching the film and chatting with Merete, I certainly feel inspired to continue my build. I want to laugh at my mistakes one day. I want to feel that pride and exhaustion when my home is finally complete. And most of all, I want to answer the question that Merete and Christopher have posed: What is home? And, if you’re reading this, I bet you do too!

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FILM UPDATES:

Download the full film on iTunes here.

Own it on DVD  *with special features including: full length 12 minute interview with Dee Williams, extra build footage, and interviews with building code enforcers.

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Jenna Spesard is a writer by trade. She is currently building a Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop Host. After the build is complete, they plan to travel around North America in their tiny house blogging and photographing their adventure. More on their tiny house and giant journey here

Written by Jenna Spesard — June 05, 2014

Filed under: Build it yourself   Dee Williams   movie   See a Tiny House   small house   Tiny homes   Tiny house movie   video  

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