Going Metric: Lone's Plans for a Fencl in Denmark

Lone Hansen has some beautiful views about tiny houses. She lives in Denmark, and is a Buddhist, member of the Royal Danish Navy, and tiny house builder. She's shared the following details on her plans to build a Fencl in Denmark. 

I have a small plot of land on the island of Zealand in Denmark. This is where I would like to build a small house. Not just any normal house, but rather a house that does not impact the environment more than necessary.

Being a Buddhist, it is important for me to leave as small an imprint on the environment as possible. Since we are all interdependent, then there is no reason to bring any aggressiveness into our dealings with our environment.

I will build a small passive solar house with solar power and solar water heating. There will be a solar venting system on the roof. Off the grid. Small because it leaves the smallest footprint on the environment. It does not take much to heat it, since it will be well insulated with triple glazed windows (low energy windows) and thick layer of insulation under the floor, in the walls and roof. And easy and quick to clean ;-)

I've worked in the Royal Danish Navy for 3.5 years. So I got used to living in small spaces with one cupboard and one drawer. The interior design of boats is an inspiration for practical solutions to hold all the stuff that one can gather in a lifetime. The question is how much space one needs to be fully satisfied and content and how much stuff. If the space is well thought out, then it is possible to live in a shoebox.

Lone HansenLone Hansen 

However, I needed inspiration for my small build. I looked all around the internet and came across Tumbleweed, The Tiny House Company. These houses seems to fit my needs very well, and are filled with practical solutions and ideas. I fell in love with the Fencl and Whidbey house and bought the plans.

When I got the drawings, I realized that they were in feet and inches. It is however almost impossible to get any kind of ruler with feet and inches here in Denmark, since our entire industry is based on the meter system. Recalculating all the measurements seemed a little daunting and could possible lead to mistakes, since I am not that skilled in the imperial system.

I contacted Tumbleweed to ask if they happen to have a metric version of the two houses. Shortly after, I received a mail, that they would be so kind and make metric versions for me. I've just got those yesterday. And they look just fine and seems correct at the first glance. So I thank Tumbleweed very much for doing the recalculations of the drawings. It has been a time-consuming work. 

Now I just need to make some redrawing of the house plans, so they are according to the Danish building code. This means that the Fencl will become a bit wider with more insulation in the floor, walls and roof. The Whidbey will be lower (too tall for the area it would be build) and also a bit wider with more insulation in the floor, walls and roof. Both will have 200 mm. minimum of insulation in the floor, 300 mm in the walls and 400 mm in the roof area. This might need some recalculation of the strength of the structure. I will add some extra big windows on the south elevation and roof to get more passive solar heating compared to the original drawings.

I expect to start building the Fencl next spring when the frosty weather is over!

Written by Guest Blogger — December 14, 2012

Filed under: building codes   converting plans   denmark   Fencl   green building   metric   plans  

J.T. Answers Your Questions!

Recently, we posted an article about J.T.'s modified Walden. It started a great conversation- blog readers responded with over 160 comments! J.T. has done his best to answer some of the questions you asked. 

J.T. in Chair


Waste water:

Alexis asked: When the septic tank gets full, is there somewhere to empty it or does it go to one of those sewage processing plants?

J.T. says: Black water is collected in an 18 gallon waste water tank by Thetford. They make a lot of RV supplies. The tank is on wheels and sits directly below the toilet under the trailer. This can be dumped at any RV park that offers a sewer dump station. For the grey water  I use a separate waste-line which collects and drains daily onto topsoil/mulch pit and vegetation.

Rain Water:

Peatstack asked: Can the house harvest rainwater, does it have a tank/filter, does it generate electricity or use a battery system with solar/ propane generator? Can it accomodate a composting toilet that the house needs no septic system? I would like a house that can sit on open agricultural land without any systems connections, the occasional propane tank and grey water drain accepted.

J.T. says: The roof's surface area is quite small, but you could divert rainwater into a collection tank for irrigation: a standard rain barrel would be overkill, but a 10 gallon tank would work. I have a 25 gallon drinking water tank onboard with a water pump. I can also hook up to a 3/4 inch garden hose. Make sure you put an RV/Marine drinking water hose or your water supply will have an off plastic odor. Water heater and pump are powered by 12v batter. 120v comes from a 20 amp extension cord into a 30 amp circuit breaker box using around .5 to 1kw per day.

Solar Power:

Annette asked: This looks like it would be the PERFECT portable office for our mounted drill team. I do have a question regarding using solar power as an energy source. Has anyone installed a solar set up and if so, what did they use and how is it working to help out with their energy usage? 

J.T. says: A Solman Action Packer System could run this house easily. A plug and play system is the solution for a tiny house- something for sure in the near future. I am considering A. 2 fixed panels on the roof of the tiny house. Orientation to the sun could be limited when a new location is found. The Solman Action Packer could easily fit in the loft area above the front door or B. 2 fixed panels on the top of my truck with the Solman system in the back of my truck. It could be parked daily in different spots to optimize sunlight, then plugged into my house daily to charge on board batteries. 

Stove and Oven:

Erica Gott asked: In mine, I want a full stove, with range AND oven, even if it's small. I love cooking and need one. I can't wait to have my own tiny home.

J.T. says: I have a 2 burner propane stove by Suburban. No oven, though a typical RV oven would fit in nicely. I use a 20 gallon propane tank under the trailer, which runs about $6 a month.

Refrigerator:

Libertymen asked: Is the refrigerator too small? 

J.T. says: I have a 3.1 cubic foot fridge under standard counter height. A 9.9 cubic foot fridge takes up the same foot print and stands around 50 inches high. You would lose useable counter space, but gain storage space

Packing Up:

Bethany asked: How does he keep things from falling off the shelves when he is moving? As well as the furniture sliding around? 

J.T. says: It takes about 10 minutes to pack everything up, and it all goes in a box! 

Front Addition: 

Jan Dregalla asked: Love the customization, especially the up-lighting  towel window shades, kitchen shelving and Ikea shelving. I'm curious, does the 2' addition on the front affect towing?

J.T. says: The extra 2 ft and added weight is on the rear, actually distributing the weight more evenly. The standard design has a lot of the weight on the towing hitch


Thanks for your great questions! 

Written by Nara Williams — December 11, 2012

Filed under: appliances   floor plans   home design   plans   small house   structure   Tumbleweed   walden  

Jonathan Black: Tiny House Builder, Grandson Extraordinaire

I try really hard to be a loving granddaughter: I visit my grandma as much as possible, take her out to lunch as often as she'll allow, and occasionally even help clean out her basement. So naturally, I've always had reason to believe I was the model grandchild.

That is, until I met Jonathan Black at the Tumbleweed workshop in LA.

 Jonathan Black Jonathan Black 

A former CalPoly student, 26 year old Jonathan chose to seek a different educational path after several unsatisfying years of school. He currently works as a server at a restaurant in San Luis Obispo, and says he's much happier dealing with "life stress" than "school stress." Now, he's setting out on a whole new meaningful adventure: tiny house building for a cause.

Jonathan's grandpa has stenosis, and is trying to plan ahead for the unfortunate possibility of needing to use a wheelchair. His house in Morgan Hill, however, is not wheelchair accessible. To solve this problem, the family has hatched a brilliant plan: Jonathan will build a wheelchair accessible wing on his grandparents' house.

There's only one problem: to work on the house, Jonathan needs a place to stay. His grandparents owned both a motor home and a shed, but neither was an option. The motor home needed too much work, and grandpa had already converted the shed into an office.

The perfect solution? A Tumbleweed Tiny House for Jonathan.

Jonathan loves the idea of avoiding debt, and is excited to integrate his tiny house into a larger meaningful project for his family. He purchased the Fencl plans before coming to LA. 

Brainstorming at the workshop 

Jonathan played around with many different designs at the workshop, getting input from his mom, Bethany, and other helpful attendees.

He will build the Fencl in January, hoping to use as many found and donated materials as possible. He will be blogging about the process as he goes, as well as checking in with us here.

After he completes his tiny house, he'll begin work on the wing for his grandparents. "My mom doesn't want it to look like a disabled wing," explained Bethany. "We want Jonathan to do something that doesn't look ugly, because it's a sensitive issue." Jonathan will be mentored by a local building inspector who is also an ADA inspector, seeking ways to make the wing both aesthetically pleasing and wheelchair accessible.

By the end of next year, he'll have not only blown me out of the water in the best grandchild competition, but will have completed a little house of his own. Two birds, one stone anyone?

Jonathan with grandparents and mom

Right now, Jonathan is looking for trailers in the Morgan Hill area, so please let us know if you can help!

 

Written by Nara Williams — December 07, 2012

Filed under: Build it yourself   home design   house plan   plans   small house   wheelchair accessible   workshops  

Affordable House Plans

We've made it easier than ever to afford Tumbleweed House Plans. Now you have the option to order your plans today and pay them off over the next year.

Starting at just $69.90 per month, you can order professionally drawn house plans. And it's simple. Your credit card will be charged each month on the same day. For instance, if you purchase plans on November 14th, you'll be charged on the 14th of each month for the 12 months (from November - October).

You'll receive your plans instantly and can start building right away.

Not sure which set of plans to purchase? We make it simple by allowing you to exchange a set of plans for any other set of the same value up to 2 years after your purchase.

This new program is available on the following house plans:


EPU WEEBEE LUSBY
TARLETON WALDEN FENCL
BODEGA LORING NEW VESICA
HARBINGER WHIDBEY ENESTI
SEBASTAROSA B-53


Written by Steve Weissmann — November 13, 2012

Filed under: plans  
Tumbleweed Tiny House Company
bodega loring nv
harbinger Whidbey sebastarosa
enesti b53 zglass

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