Top Laundry Units for Tiny Homes

Tumbleweed Cypress-24 with EdgeStar Washer/Dryer Combo

One of the most frequently asked questions regarding tiny home living is: Can I do laundry in a tiny home? The answer is: Yes! There are many units available and elements to consider, such as: space requirements, load capacity, weight, portability, automatic vs. manual, ventilation, power consumption, and budget. 

When our customers request an automatic laundry machine for their Tumbleweed, we always provide them with a combination washer/dryer. This is because combo units are compact enough for tiny home living without sacrificing the quality and connivence of a standard automatic machine.  

Dave Fisher, our Tumbleweed builder, researched and tested many combination washer/dryers for our House-To-Gos. Below we'd like to share the two combination units we recommend and use.  

1). LG - Model # WM3455HW

LG Washer/Dryer Combo
  • Retail: $1,435.00 (as of 8/8/2014)
  • Size: 2.3 cubic ft. / Dimensions: 33.5" H x 24" W x 25.25" D
  • Weight: 159 lbs.
  • Ventless
  • 15 lb wash capacity
  • 9 lb dry capacity
  • Highly energy- and water-efficient
  • Nine (9) washing cycles / Six (6) drying cycles
  • Five (5) temperature levels
  • Also comes in silver  

Photo credit: Compact Appliance

 2). EdgeStar - Model # CWD1510S 

EdgeStar Washer/Dryer Combo
  • Retail: $949.00 (as of 8/8/2014)
  • Size: 2.0 cubic ft.  / Dimensions: 33 1/6" H x 23 7/16" W x 23 1/2" D 
  • Weight: 188 lbs.
  • Ventless
  • 15 lbs. wash capacity
  • 7.71 lbs. dry capacity
  • Seven (7) wash cycles
  • Three (3) wash/rinse temperatures / Five (5) spin speeds
  • Also comes in white  

Photo creditCompact Appliance

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If automatic laundry is not for you, below are three zero electricity options commonly used in tiny homes.
 

3). The Wonder Wash

 Wonder Wash

  • Retail: $42.95 (as of 8/8/2014)
  • Size:  12" x 12" x 16"
  • Weight: Less than 6 lbs empty
  • Wash capacity: Approx. 10 T-shirts or 2 pairs of blue jeans
  • Wash time: 1-2 minutes
  • Operation: Crank handle
  • Bonus Video - Watch as Tumbleweed Workshop presenter Art Cormier uses the Wonder Wash

 

 

Photo credit: www.thevoltreport.com

4). The Laundry Pod 

Laundry Pod
  • Retail: $99.95 (as of 8/8/2014)
  • Size: 14.45" x 14.02" x 13.55"
  • Weight: 6.5 lbs empty
  • Wash capacity:  Approx. 10 regular articles of clothing
  • Wash time: 1 minute
  • Operation: Crank handle

 

 

Photo credit: www.containerstore.com 

5). Scrubba

*Lightweight travel option. Backpacker friendly.

Scrubba
  • Retail: $54.95 (as of 8/8/2014)
  • Size: When bag is flat - 21.3" x 12.6" 
  • Weight: Less than 5 oz.
  • Wash capacity:  Approx. 2 days worth of summer clothes
  • Wash time: 1-3 minutes
  • Operation: Rubbing against internal wash board 

 

Photo credit: www.thescrubba.com

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Jenna Spesard is currently building a Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop Host. After the build is complete, they plan to travel around North America in their tiny house blogging and photographing their adventure. More on their tiny house and giant journey here.
 

    Tiny House Parking Available

    Hi Tiny Housers! 

    We were contacted by Rena Patrick, who has TWO parking sites available for tiny homes on her property on Quadra Island, British Columbia. More below - 

    "There is electricity, water, cell phone reception, and land for rent. Wi-fi connection can be provided. Would be suitable for two friends wanting to live close to one another in a quiet and peaceful rural setting, which is walking distance from all amenities. 100$/week Canadian, long term available." 

    Please contact Rena directly if interested - renapatrick@poetic.com

    Photo of parking spots provided by Rena Patrick

    All the best,
    Tumbleweed Staff

     

    Written by Jenna Spesard — August 01, 2014

    Filed under: British Columbia   Parking   tiny House   Tiny house parking  

    High School Students Build Three Tiny Homes

    The Academy of Career Education (a.k.a “ACE” high school) in Reno, Nevada is not only embracing tiny homes as an alternative housing option but also as an educational tool for their students. Being a tuition-free charter school focusing on construction and engineering, each student at ACE becomes OSHA certified and is offered a variety of courses with hands-on training in home building. 

    “We were looking for new projects,” ACE instructor Tony Clark explains, “and we happened to see a news story on a boy that built his own tiny home instead of a fort. After that, we did some research and found Tumbleweed.” After pitching the project to Tumbleweed President Steve Weissmann, Mr. Clark and his students were donated a set of Cypress 20 plans. Clark also attended a workshop last fall and purchased three Tumbleweed trailers. In January 2014, ACE students began building three tiny homes. 

    “We have about 45-50 students taking the course, between the ages of 15-18 years old,” explains Clark. “All the traditional techniques for building a home are covered, and then some! There are more codes to follow when building a tiny home, as well as weight, propane and movement to consider. I think the biggest benefit is that it makes the kids better problem solvers.”

    Justin Moore, a student taking the course, believes building a tiny home will make anyone a better carpenter. "Tiny homes are a growing trend, and learning to build off-grid housing is extremely beneficial." 

    Ace High School

    One of Clark’s favorite teaching moments was when two of his award winning carpentry students installed the shower insert. “They triple checked their work, but they forgot to make sure the trailer was level.” Clark chuckled, remembering. “They had to do the work all over again. It’s not something you would encounter in a regular home, and so it was an excellent learning experience for them.” 

    Before summer break, the students were sheathing the roof and had started on electricity and insulation. They’ll pick back up when schools begins in September, with the goal of being finished by December 2014. 

    “We have some interested buyers for two of the tiny homes, and we’ll keep the third on display.” Mr. Clark went on to say that all the money made from the sale will go straight back into funding the program. “I want to continue building tiny homes at ACE. The students have really embraced it.” 

    Justin (Clark's student) agrees,  "I think tiny homes are very very cool. I could see myself living in one, but I would customize it to fit my lifestyle." 

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    *All photos provided by ACE High School

    *For more information on the ACE High School Tiny House project, click here.

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    Jenna Spesard is currently building a Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop Host. After the build is complete, they plan to travel around North America in their tiny house blogging and photographing their adventure. More on their tiny house and giant journey here

    Written by Jenna Spesard — July 29, 2014

    Filed under: Academy of Career Education   ACE   Build it yourself   Cypress   design   High School   Reno   School   tiny   tiny home   tiny house   Tumbleweed  

    Tiny House For Three

    Family posed on the porch of their "big house" (above) and their barn raiser (below).

    Meg, Brandy, and their 2-year-old son nicknamed "R.A.D." are about to dramatically shrink their idea of home. Having just received a Tumbleweed barn raiser, the family of three will be shedding approximately 3,000 square feet!

    “Somewhere between growing to despise our huge mortgage and realizing we would never be able to take my mother on the Alaskan cruise she dreamed of, something just snapped in my mind.” Meg explains why her family has decided to downsize from their 3,193 sq foot home and nearly $2,000 a month mortgage payment.

    “Losing my mom made us realize the ‘American Dream’ of the big house with the white fence was really just a pair of shackles preventing us from doing the things we really wanted to do.” Sadly, Meg’s mother recently lost a 17-month battle with cancer. Before she was diagnosed they had planned on moving the whole family from Texas to Washington. “The more I thought about the plans I was making with my mom, the more resolute I was that I needed this change. I was sick to my stomach with the knowledge that I let the big house weigh us down." It was then that Meg and Brandy finally made the decision to drop the big house, and travel around the country with a tiny home before settling in Washington for R.A.D to start school. 

    With Brandy attending college and Meg working two jobs, the couple quickly realized that finding time to build was going to be a challenge. That’s when they stumbled upon Tumbleweed’s barn raiser - a professionally built skeleton of a Tumbleweed tiny home secured on a Tumbleweed trailer. The family chose the Cypress 24’ Horizon model, which will allow a private bedroom for their son as well as a loft bedroom for themselves.  

    “Having the professional builders do all the heavy lifting and, most importantly, the strapping and securing of the structure to the trailer was the decision maker in the build vs. buy debate for me.” Meg explains. “I’ve had nightmares of the house sliding off the trailer, so the peace of mind that comes with having professionals secure my house is worth it’s weight in gold!" 

    Meg and Brandy ordered their barn raiser in mid-March and received a notification it was ready on April 22nd. The family set off to retrieve their new home - one that is equal in size of their current master bathroom! When they first stepped inside the tiny dwelling that would one day carry them off on an adventure, Meg remembers thinking it felt huge and tiny simultaneously. Check out their height charts: 

    “Our son calls it his ‘Biiiiigg Hooose’, and it (the tiny home) will probably continue to feel big to him while he is little.” - Meg

    How will this family cope with this dramatic downsize? Check back in for updates on Meg, Brandy, and R.A.D. as they finish their house and prepare to travel around the U.S.A. 

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    All photos provided by Meg and Brandy. 

    Follow this tiny house family on their blog here. Like them on facebook here.

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    Jenna Spesard is currently building a Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop Host. After the build is complete, they plan to travel around North America in their tiny house blogging and photographing their adventure. More on their tiny house and giant journey here

     

     

     

    Little House on the Ferry

    Once upon a time, Arianne and Sean lived in two separate houses in Las Vegas. Between the two dwellings, the couple had over 4,000 square feet combined. So how did they end up spending “happily ever after” in an Alaskan abode surmounting to no more than 150 square feet? Well, it all started with a newspaper clipping… 

    Arianne had always considered downsizing and living tiny, but it wasn’t until her mother sent her a crinkled photograph of a Tumbleweed featured in the Denver Post that she truly fell in love. “I used to dream about it.” Arianne admitted. “Sean and I wanted to live a greener lifestyle.” Her partner is an engineer in sustainable and renewable energy. Minimizing would help open other doors for the couple as well, including a big move to a certain beautiful and adventurous state. 

    With an Alaskan tiny house on the menu, Arianne and Sean teamed up with Tumbleweed’s Meg Stephens to design their perfect abode - a modified Elm. The couple knew the main course of this particular tundra was best served cold, which meant a higher R-value insulation and electric heating in the floors. They also customized their house to have a galley kitchen, four skylights, and two lofts!

    But once the house was complete, Arianne and Sean faced another challenge – getting their house from the Tumbleweed build site in Colorado to Anchorage. Their journey began with a cross-country road trip, including a stroll up the gorgeous Pacific Coast Highway.

    Next the couple took to the sea, as they boarded the Alaskan Marine Highway Ferry.“Most people were boarding cars, but we pulled up towing a house!

    The workers were surprised to say the least.” Arianne chuckled, remembering. “They said it was the first house they ever loaded onto the ferry, and it barely fit!” She recalls seeing numerous whales along the swaying careen up the west coast of Canada and Alaska. Finally, they docked in Anchorage, and set out to begin their new life.

    Now, half a year later, Arianne works locally for the Air Force piloting C-17s – a plane that could fit six Tumbleweeds inside! She and Sean are enjoying their new house, new location, and new neighbors – most recently a curious moose greeted them one morning, resting his head on their front porch!

    Who knows, maybe he is interested in a tiny house with a little extra antler-room?

    *All photos provided by Arianne and Sean

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    Jenna Spesard is a writer by trade. She is currently building a Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop Host. After the build is complete, they plan to travel around North America in their tiny house blogging and photographing their adventure. More on their tiny house and giant journey here

    Written by Jenna Spesard — June 11, 2014

    Filed under: alaska   Elm   green building   green living   Jenna Spesard   See a Tiny House   small house   Tiny House   travel   Tumbleweed  
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