Cost of Towing a Tiny House RV

We travel full time with our Tiny House RV and so far we've gone 15,000 miles in eight months. I don't know of any other Tiny House RV that travels as much as we do, so we've had to figure out a lot of logistics on the road. Below I've outlined my monthly expenses in hopes that it is helpful for my fellow travel bugs! 

If you're looking for explanations on towing specifications and requirements, click here.

Our wet Tiny House RV - we assume the house weighs more after a rain!

MY MONTHLY EXPENSES ON THE ROAD

GAS: $726

Our Tiny House RV weighs 10,100 pounds when fully loaded. We tow with a Ford F-250 Diesel 4x4 and get between 8-10 mpg. We put 2,070 miles per month on our truck. That number includes ALL driving, not just towing. 

MAINTENANCE ON TRUCK: $294

We had to replace a few parts in our truck, including the FICM, the alternator and two batteries. I can't say whether this is due to towing or not, because the 2006 Ford F-250s are known for these problems. Hopefully this number will start to go down. 

MAINTENANCE ON TRAILER: $55 

Regular 10,000 bearing inspection (they were good). We had to replace our tongue jack because we crashed the Tiny House RV on our maiden voyage... Full explanation here. We also had to replace our chimney cap a few times due to damage from low tree branches.

TRUCK INSURANCE: $95 

We are insured through State Farm. We have liability coverage on our "tow load." 

TRUCK PAYMENT: $0

Our truck is paid off. Yippee!

TINY HOUSE RV PAYMENT: $0

Our Tiny House RV is paid off. Yippee!

MOBILE INTERNET: $130

We use Verizon wireless as our provider because they have the fastest data service. We've been relatively happy with the service, but it's expensive. Due to our web related jobs, we need at least 30 gigabytes a month. This isn't even enough for us to stream movies, we always run out! Obviously if you do not need 30 GB (or the internet at all) this number is irrelevant. Campgrounds sometimes have WIFI available, but it's almost always terribly slow. 

CAMPGROUND FEES: $238

We park in campgrounds on average 9 nights a month. The rest of the time we park on private property, offered by some of the most gracious people in the world (our followers and other Tiny House RV enthusiasts). That helps A LOT! Campground fees can average between $10 - $60 a night. We are a member of Passport America, which offers a 50% discount on thousands of campgrounds all over North America. 

PROPANE: $12

We use propane for our cooktop, water heater and sometimes to power our refrigerator. 

WATER / ELECTRIC: $0

We fill up our water tank in campgrounds or from our parking hosts. So far we haven't had to pay for water or power (of which we use very little), aside from our campground fees. 

TRASH: $0

We carry our trash and dispose of it responsibly in campgrounds.

TOTAL AVERAGE MONTHLY EXPENSES FOR TOWING & TINY LIFESTYLE  = $1550

This total number is for two people and while it might seem high, it's less than just our apartment rent payment in Los Angeles! We could save a lot of money by traveling less and canceling our internet, but that's not the lifestyle we want at this time. You might notice that this number does not include food expenses, cell phones expenses, student loans, etc. That is because those expenses would be the same on or off the road, tiny or big. 

QUESTIONS?? I'll do my best to answer them. 

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop host. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting an open house. Follow their informative blog. 
 
   

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — May 19, 2015

Filed under: Tiny Home   Tiny House   Tiny House Giant Journey   Tiny House RV   Tow   Tow Capacity   Towing   Travel  

5 Lessons I Learned From My Tiny House RV

I've been traveling around in my tiny house RV for six months now. I'm very comfortable inside the small space, but that doesn't mean there weren't a few challenges along the way. Once or twice I’ve cried out in frustration, “it’s too small!” Other times I’ve been thankful for having less space to clean and maintain, and for the freedom it has provided.

Below are FIVE unexpected lessons my tiny house RV has taught me in the past six months:

1). I CARE MORE ABOUT CONSUMPTION

I know how much water I use on a daily basis  - approximately 15 gallons when I take navy showers. I know how often I need to dump the urine container on my composting toilet - every 3 days. I know how much propane I use per month - about 15 pounds. I have to physically empty my grey water tank, fill my fresh water tank, refill my propane tanks, dump my toilet, etc.

I take navy showers and use the Nature's Head to conserve water and propane. 

Measuring my consumption in physical labor has made me more conscious of my waste. There’s a HUGE difference between seeing decimals and graphs on your monthly bill and having to physically refill your tanks. I use less. I waste less. I save more money.

2). I THINK BEFORE I PURCHASE

I have nightmares about clutter. In a tiny traveling house, clutter can mean the difference between owning three mugs or four. I don’t shop often, but when I do I have to know: 1). What purpose will the new item serve? 2). Can it replace something else and/or increase the functionality of my daily life? 3). Where will it be stored? If I can’t answer those three questions, I DON'T NEED IT!

I try to keep my kitchen counters empty. Everything tucks away and has a place.

3). I APPRECIATE THE IMPERFECTIONS

As I travel around, I've had the opportunity to tour many other tiny house RVs. Sometimes I swoon over a great space saving idea or an innovative layout. I call it "tiny-envy." I have to remind myself that my partner and I had zero construction experience before building our tiny abode. It's not perfect, but my house is still pretty darn cool. And it's mine! When we were building I was so meticulous about everything. If something wasn't perfect, I wanted to redo it. Now those imperfections that once made me cringe, don’t bother me at all. In fact, I kind of like them! Each nick, scratch and hole was a lesson and a memory.

4). "IF YOU BUILD IT, YOU WILL FILL IT"

This is sound advice from my friend and fellow tiny house RVer - Art Cormier. Guillaume and I recently modified our staircase to have a few extra storage compartments. And now they're full! Uh oh…the clutter monster is knocking at our door! We’re going to have to think twice before adding any new shelving or storage spaces in the future. If there's no place to put new stuff, I don't need it! (See lesson #2).

My kitchen cabinet. I own three mugs, two cups, two wine glasses and a bunch of spices. It's full!

5). I'M LESS NEEDY

Perhaps my partner would argue, but I'm going to make an assumption that I'm less needy now than I've ever been before. I have less, but I want and need less as well. When I think about all the stuff I used to own and purchase, I feel overwhelmed. This small space has challenged me to unburden myself. I like the new care-free me!

Just for fun, here are a few more ways my life has changed from traveling in a tiny house RV:

I clean less. I shop less. I cook more. I consume less. I primp less. I dress better. I eat better. I sleep more. I read more. I watch TV less. I drive less. I play with my dog more. I hike more. I go to the gym less. I travel WAY more.

How would a tiny house RV change you?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

Written by Jenna Spesard — March 16, 2015

Filed under: five lessons   giant journey   lessons   Tiny Home   Tiny House   travel  

Annie's Traveling Tea House

Annie with her carpenters: Adrian and Luis

Get ready for a really unique tiny house RV story!

A lot has happened to Annie Coburn since taking the August 2014 Tumbleweed workshop in Dallas. She admits that she was unsure of her future plans when she first decided to attend the workshop, but one comment from another attendee changed her mind (and her life) completely. "A lady said: 'I know this person who travels around in her tiny house and sells .....' I don't even remember what she was selling, but that statement put all the pieces together for me," Annie told us. 

Interior: "Tiny House Teas"

Annie has always loved to travel. In 2010 she created a travel website for seniors. So the idea of creating a business that could function out of the tiny house RV, while wayfaring around the United States, tied all of her passions together in one beautiful package. It wasn't long before Annie received her Tumbleweed trailer and started building her traveling Cypress 20 Equator without dormers.

Tumbleweed Cypress

"When I saw the picture of the Cypress, I wanted to give it a hug," Annie recalls. "It's so cute!"

But what does Annie intend to sell out of her traveling tiny home? TEA, of course! In the late 1990's, she lived in China and remains in contact with her friends there. "They know tea and tea producers," Annie comments. "So I have access to premium teas." In September she flew to China to strike up a partnership and, just like that, "Tiny House Teas" was born. 

Annie's tiny house RV is now close to completion, and she'll soon hit the road with her traveling tea business. Her first destination will be the Florida Keys. "The tiny house gives us options," Annie explains. "We can stay as long as we wish. When we feel the need for a change, just hook-up, fill-up and GO."

 

For more information on Tiny House Teas, visit the facebook page and website.

*All personal photos and video provided by Annie Coburn 

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

 

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — February 20, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   Equator   Tiny Home   Tiny House   Tiny House Teas   Travel   Workshop  

Pack for Adventure: What to Bring in your Tiny House RV

The open road. Photo credit: Lisa Luken

Whether you are planning to be on the road everyday or you are choosing to stay parked in your favorite corner of the world for a bit, it’s likely that you have chosen a tiny house for the freedom it will provide. The adventure looks different for everyone, but it undoubtedly means a journey with less “stuff”.

So how do you approach the overwhelming task of choosing what to take with you?  How will you fit everything into only a couple hundred square feet?  The key is to focus on the fun ahead then choose what to pack for the adventure. 

You’re already being creative and living intentionally by choosing a tiny house.  You’re focusing on all that you’ll gain, not what you’ll give up.   So approach the task of evaluating your “stuff” with this same positive mindset.

A Tumbleweed Elm out for an adventure

Begin by dreaming big.  Ask yourself:

  1. How do I want to feel when I wake up each morning?
  2. What will I enjoy doing each day?
  3. How will I relax each night before dozing off?
  4. What will remind me of the people and places I love?

Then, just like you’d pack a suitcase, you’ll need to know your space and plan accordingly.  Consider:

  1. Do you desire lots of open “white space”?
  2. Or do you want to utilize every inch?
  3. What spaces could serve double (or triple) duty?
  4. How easily will your items transport?

With a clear vision of what a day in the life of your tiny house might look like, use your excitement to plan what to pack.

You’ll want to go through your “stuff” and continuously ask one question:

“Will this support me now on this adventure?” 

Interior of Tumbleweed Elm Horizon

As you do this, keep in mind the following:

1). Cover your basic needs

Think versatility and comfort for clothes, compact and dual purpose for your kitchen items.  Think creatively and resourcefully with everything!

2). Remember your vision

Be selective and intentional, keeping in mind the amount of white space, storage and keepsakes you’d like with you on the journey.

3). Think with an abundance mindset

Trust that anything you need will be available when you need it.  The “I might need this” reasoning will not support your freedom.  You don’t need any extra baggage!

4). Remain optimistic…

Think about the opportunities ahead and the new community of people you’ll meet.  By choosing to take only what you know you’ll need now, you’re making space for exciting new experiences.

5) Go with your gut

Remember when you experienced that gut feeling knowing that a tiny house RV was perfect for you?  Use that same gut feeling to make smart decisions about your stuff.

6). Give it a rest

Tired minds don’t make good decisions.  Working in small chunks of time can be better than putting in long days, so plan accordingly.

The open road. Photo credit: Lisa Luken

By approaching the task this way, you’ll be well prepared for the exciting adventure ahead, having intentionally chosen to bring along only what you truly need, use and love.

You’ll be ready to enjoy your tiny house and the big life it provides…with just the right items for the adventure.    

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Lisa Luken is a Simple Living Mentor, helping people find joy and freedom through simplifying.  She and her family recently sold their “more than enough” home in Illinois, let go of nearly three quarters of their possessions and moved to the coast of Maine.  For more inspiration on simplifying and to learn how Lisa supports others on their journey, visit her website SimpleJoyLiving.com.

 

 

photo credit: Lisa Luken

Written by Guest Blogger — February 16, 2015

Filed under: Adventure   Downsize   Packing   Simple Living   Tiny Home   Tiny House   Travel  

5 Tips for Tiny House Travel

Tiny House GJ traveling through New Brunswick Canada

My Tumbleweed Cypress has rolled all the way from Los Angeles to Nova Scotia to the Florida Keys, where I’m currently writing this blog post. In the four months and 8,000 miles I’ve traveled with a tiny home, I’ve learned a lot through trial and error. Below is a short list I’ve compiled in hopes that it will be helpful to future tiny house travelers.

*Note: A few of the below are also applicable to RVing. That’s intentional. I’ve learned a lot from RVers and many of the same rules are relevant.

5 Tips for Tiny House Travel

1). You can weigh your tiny home at any truck scale. The best way is to weigh the tiny house with your truck attached, then park, detach, weigh your truck alone and subtract that weight from the total. It’s important to know your weight and to have a tow vehicle that can handle the load. It is especially important to be aware of your tongue weight, which can be found by purchasing a tongue scale. Many tiny homes have a heavy tongue weight because of the loft. You can counter balance your tongue weight by placing some of your heavier items in the back of the trailer (like water tanks or solar batteries). You can also use a weight distribution system, like I do.

Tiny House GJ's Weight Distribution System

2). Call campgrounds ahead of time. I call ahead and tell the campground that I have a 24 foot travel trailer that requires 30 amp electrical, water and (if I know my 15 gallon water tank will not be sufficient) a sewage drain for grey water. If they ask for the brand of the travel trailer, I tell them it’s a “Tumbleweed tiny house, you know… like on Tiny House Nation?” And that usually rings a bell. No campground has EVER turned me down. In fact, click here for a list of campgrounds that I’ve stayed at.

Eddie's Tumbleweed in an Austin, TX RV Park

3). Attach bubble levels to your tiny house. I have one on the back center of my house (for left/right leveling) and one on the side (for front/back leveling). I use Anderson levelers for left/right leveling and I LOVE them. With these levelers, I can raise one side of my house up to four inches simply by driving onto them! If I need more than that, I pull one side of my tiny house up onto planks of wood, and then use the levelers. For front/back leveling, I use the tongue jack. Never use the scissor jacks for leveling; They are for stability only.

 Tiny House GJ's Anderson Levelers

4). Get an RV GPS. I use a Rand McNally RV GPS to navigate around low clearances, weight restrictions, propane restrictions, etc. It’s excellent and it is worth its weight in gold for my peace of mind.

5). Secure Loose Items. Add a lip to your shelves and hook & eyes to your drawers. Using a bungie cord works as well, but if every shelf and drawer requires a bungie, you’ll die of tedium. The less “lock and loading” the better. It takes me about 20 minutes to secure everything inside my house and another 20 minutes to pack up the outside. I’ve got it down to a science, but I’m also always improving.

Any travelers out there want to share some of your own tips? Comment below!

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — January 08, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   RV Park   Tiny home   Tiny House   Travel  

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