Where's Nara's House?

Wondering where this college girl's house is? If you haven't heard, Nara is in the process of obtaining a Fencl to live in for her last semester of school. Her plans have been delayed ever so slightly, but she's keeping strong. Read about her initial process here, and find out about how black ice, blizzards, and mandatory driving bans can be small impediments to tiny house transport below. 

Last Friday, I learned one important thing about a housewarming: you need a house. Upon failing to produce one of those despite a good deal of self-promotion, I felt a little something like ashamed. "Is it so tiny I can't see it?" asked my supportive friends. A very patient staff stood by day after day, while I postponed the Facebook event not once, but thrice. 

But it just so happens that when other things aren't warm, like say the roads in Ohio, pretty much anything can go wrong. In other words, some pesky black ice led to a minor hiccup with my house delivery. After already being behind schedule, the waiting game continued through the weekend as the trailer awaited repair some hundreds of miles away. Finally, I got word that it would arrive by the end of that week. And then....

A blizzard hit the East Coast. 

Window viewA lovely Saturday morning view 

Yup. We got slammed. As much as I want to say "just my luck," I have enough life experience (and access to news channels) to realize that I'm far from being the only poor soul affected by bad weather conditions, and that ultimately my tiny house woes are very, well, tiny. I'm glad to be warm, safe, and kind of well fed. 

As some of you may have heard, this whole state-wide driving ban thing led to a bummer of a weekend for everyone planning on attending the Tumbleweed workshop. Several Californians flew out on Thursday only to be cooped up in a hotel for a long weekend. I myself drove up from Western Massachusetts in the early hours of the snowstorm to find a ghost town. And most importantly, my apologies to all of the would-be-attendees. 

On the plus side, all this time lounging around in a king sized bed has certainly given me the opportunity to think things over. 

What can you doWhat can you do? Watch HBO, I guess. 

It's hard to have things that directly affect you be entirely out of your control. I've come to peace with it, for the most part, but I won't deny that I've been going through a little bit of emotional turmoil. It's been over two weeks since I expected a delivery, and I still don't know when I'll see the house!

I'm learning everyday that it's important to be flexible, and it's an amazing source of comfort to have a network of friends that will help you out. I will have squatted with my dear friends in Northampton, rent-free, for exactly a month. They've been incredibly patient and supportive, even if they think they're entitled to all of my groceries. I guess it's fair: my backpacks and suitcases have lined the living room wall, half unpacked, day in and day out, and my ferret has been eating everybody's headphones. 

FerretWreaking havoc on personal electronics AND personal relationships 

But as all of the older, wiser folks in my life have told me, it's a part of the experience. My mom's number one piece of comfort for me in darker days has always been "it will give you something to write about." So here I am, writing about it. (That said, my first attempt at 'writing about it', during which I was seeing red and occasionally punching the table, would probably make my mom disown me.) 

The reality is, it's no one's fault. These things happen, and there's a certain risk involved in pulling any kind of trailer when the roads are icy- I knew that at the beginning. I appreciate the work of all of those involved, like the truck driver who went through hell and still sent me a very sweet apology note. 

This is not so much a lesson about transporting tiny houses as it is about remaining patient. It's not the end of the world. It's important to keep weather in mind when you're attempting to transport a small house in the winter- just ask Molly- but it's also not inevitable that something will go wrong. You just have to keep your chin up, and be grateful that a better future is on it's way, storm or no storm.

Thanks for your patience, everyone, and thanks for being so understanding about the workshop cancellation- we'll make it up to you! 

More soon, 

Nara 

Written by Nara Williams — February 12, 2013

Filed under: change in plans   Massachusetts   patience   snow   storm   stranded   tiny house   workshop  

Mixer before the workshop

The Santa Rosa Workshop 2012 was a blast. On Friday evening we had a mixer with Tumbleweed staff and fans at the Sandpiper Restaurant in Bodega Bay. Great time! Pictured below is the view of the bay from the Sandpiper.


Each month we visit 2 cities around the US. You can learn more about other upcoming workshops here.

I wanted to also thank our many presenters:

  • Kevin Casey from New Avenue Homes spoke about the process of building a backyard cottage
  • Mark Fallin, a Sonoma County local, shared his knowledge on HVAC and energy
  • Austin Hay dropped in to share his journey of building a tiny home (see his blog)
  • JT told his story of building and now living in his Tumbleweed (read more)
  • Pepper Clark of Bungalow To Go helped people design their own models and let everyone tour her two homes under construction
Just for fun, pictured below is me at the mixer enjoying a glass of wine. I'm the guy with the big goofy smile.


Written by Steve Weissmann — October 19, 2012

Filed under: Workshop  

Thanks Chicago Tiny House Fans

 

THANKS to all the amazing, friendly-as-all-heck, and enthusiastic tiny house fans/geeks/addicts that I was lucky enough to meet while teaching the Chicago Tumbleweed Tiny House Workshop. Chicago (4th visit now) still remains as one of my favorite cities ever- and man oh man does that town have some amazing musicians and blues joints! 50 people, all about tiny houses- it was a blast!

See you in NYC next! Oct 20th weekend! -Deek

Derek "Deek" Diedricksen is the mastermind behind Relaxshacks.com and is the author of 'Humble Homes, Simple Shacks'. Deek also hosts Tumbleweed Tiny House Workshops around the country.

Written by Derek Diedricksen — September 20, 2012

Filed under: Chicago   Deek   Workshop  

Northwest Univ Students to Speak in Chicago

 photo Rich Hein


We are really looking forward to a great workshop in Chicago this weekend September 15-16! We will have an amazing group of students sharing their experiences of building this great house for Northwest University. In addition we will have speakers from the Material Exchange. They are super savvy in using reclaimed materials on a variety of projects. 

Hope to see you all there! We'll be getting started about 9:00 AM and ending up at 5:00 PM 

Written by Wendy Flores — September 13, 2012

Filed under: chicago   Workshop  

Tumbleweed + Caroline Collective = Awesome!

We've secured the location for our Houston Workshop and it is going to be a blast! We are so excited to be hosting the workshop at  Caroline Collective



Caroline Collective is a coworking space that provides a unique combination of private workspace, public art space, and open desk space. It's the perfect place to host. Plus, it's only a few blocks away from the Wheeler stop on the Houston Light Rail route. We have a few more cool surprises up our sleeves for Houston. Something about food trucks...

Why not join us? Learn more about the workshop here.

Caroline Collective - 4820 Caroline St., Houston, TX 77004 Google Map


Written by Brett Torrey Haynes — June 20, 2012

Filed under: Build it yourself   Tumbleweed   Workshop  
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