Annie's Traveling Tea House

Annie with her carpenters: Adrian and Luis

Get ready for a really unique tiny house RV story!

A lot has happened to Annie Coburn since taking the August 2014 Tumbleweed workshop in Dallas. She admits that she was unsure of her future plans when she first decided to attend the workshop, but one comment from another attendee changed her mind (and her life) completely. "A lady said: 'I know this person who travels around in her tiny house and sells .....' I don't even remember what she was selling, but that statement put all the pieces together for me," Annie told us. 

Interior: "Tiny House Teas"

Annie has always loved to travel. In 2010 she created a travel website for seniors. So the idea of creating a business that could function out of the tiny house RV, while wayfaring around the United States, tied all of her passions together in one beautiful package. It wasn't long before Annie received her Tumbleweed trailer and started building her traveling Cypress 20 Equator without dormers.

Tumbleweed Cypress

"When I saw the picture of the Cypress, I wanted to give it a hug," Annie recalls. "It's so cute!"

But what does Annie intend to sell out of her traveling tiny home? TEA, of course! In the late 1990's, she lived in China and remains in contact with her friends there. "They know tea and tea producers," Annie comments. "So I have access to premium teas." In September she flew to China to strike up a partnership and, just like that, "Tiny House Teas" was born. 

Annie's tiny house RV is now close to completion, and she'll soon hit the road with her traveling tea business. Her first destination will be the Florida Keys. "The tiny house gives us options," Annie explains. "We can stay as long as we wish. When we feel the need for a change, just hook-up, fill-up and GO."

 

For more information on Tiny House Teas, visit the facebook page and website.

*All personal photos and video provided by Annie Coburn 

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

 

 

 

Written by Jenna Spesard — February 20, 2015

Filed under: Cypress   Equator   Tiny Home   Tiny House   Tiny House Teas   Travel   Workshop  

Q&A with Tiny House Experts

We asked three of our tiny house experts to answer a few Frequently Asked Questions. For the previous "Q&A with Tiny House Experts," click here.

ELLA JENKINS

Ella Jenkins / Tumbleweed Workshop Presenter

Background: Ella never built anything before undertaking a tiny home. She attended the Los Angeles workshop a few years ago and began building her Tumbleweed Fencl (now called Cypress) the next month. She built her entire tiny home wearing a skirt! Her enthusiasm was and is contagious. Ella now presents our workshops all over the country. Read more about Ella and her tiny home called "Little Yellow" on her blog

Ella's modified Tumbleweed Cypress

Question: What is your favorite part of your tiny space?

Ella: The kitchen. Or my yellow door. Or my window seat. Or...this could go on for a while.

Q: If you could do anything different to your tiny home, what would it be?
Ella: Replace my solid aluminum windows with aluminum clad wood ones (which I will be doing soon). But not much other than that, I'm pretty darn happy with everything else!
Q: What do you think is the best part of Tumbleweed's two day workshop?
Ella: Is it weird that I'm going to say the plumbing/toilet section? Probably. Composting toilets are just so interesting!
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BRITTANY YUNKER

Brittany Yunker / Tumbleweed Workshop Presenter

Background: Brittany built her Fencl (now Cypress 18-Overlook) after attending a Tumbleweed workshop.  Without any building experience, she created a beautiful cottage that she now uses as a vacation rental.  She also modified the interior and really took great effort to accent her home with charm. Take a look at her website to learn more about visiting this home.

Brittany's modified Tumbleweed Cypress

Question: What is your favorite part of your tiny house?

Brittany: My favorite part of my house is the loft bed with the skylight overhead.  It's so cozy up there, and it is wonderful to watch the stars from bed on a clear night.

Q: What was the most difficult part of your build?

Brittany: The most difficult part of the building process was overcoming all the questions in my own mind (i.e. "how the heck do you cut a birdsmouth notch at the right place in a rafter?", and answering the multitude of logistical questions that others asked me.  "Where are you going to park?", "How is the toilet going to work?", the list goes on.  I didn't have all the answers, but I tackled each issue methodically as I built, and everything came together splendidly!

Q: Any space saving advice?

Brittany: Find creative and unique ways to hang things on the wall or use vertical space such as a cabinet or closet.  Use beautiful personal belongings as artful wall hangings.  I decorated the wall of my bathroom with my earrings, jewelry and hung my (ahem, beautiful) skis from the ceiling.  Find furniture that folds, tucks away or is stowable and that fits your body when using it!

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MEG STEPHENS
Meg Stephens / Tumbleweed Designer & Workshop Presenter
Background: While Meg was getting her degree in Architecture she stumbled upon Tumbleweed and fell in love with the designs. She became fascinated with building her own and called us to order tickets to a Tumbleweed Workshop. The conversation lasted 30 minutes and ended with a scheduled job interview to come design tiny homes for Tumbleweed. Meg designed our newest model, the Linden, and is currently building one for herself and her husband to live in full time.
Meg's Tumbleweed Linden
Question: What is your favorite part of your tiny house?
Meg: I really love my trim. It took a long time to get all the curves cut, but I think the end result was totally worth it. I also really like the glass block "windows" that I made and installed high on the long sides of my house.
Q: How was it building with SIPS? Would you do anything different?
Meg: Building with SIPS (Structurally Insulated Panels) was fun, I had a big work party and we got the walls and roof up on my house in two and a half days. However, I'm nervous about doing the wiring and plumbing because the interior of the walls are not accessible. If I were to do it again today I would probably have gone with the Amish Barn Raiser instead of SIPs.
Q: What do you think is the best part of our two day workshop?
Meg: I love the discussion and seeing people make connections with each other during the course of the weekend. Many group builds and friendships have come out of the workshop, and it's an invaluable experience to add to the knowledge that the workshop provides.
Meg giving tours of a Tumbleweed Cypress on display at a workshop in early Feb 2015
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What questions should we ask in our next Q&A with Tiny House Experts?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

Written by Jenna Spesard — February 11, 2015

Filed under: Experts   Presenters   Tiny home   Tiny House   Tumbleweed   Workshop  

Q&A with Tiny House Experts

We asked three of our tiny house experts to answer a few Frequently Asked Questions:  

ART CORMIER

Art Cormier / Tumbleweed Workshop Presenter

Background:

In 2012, Art completed his Tumbleweed home using SIPS and reclaimed wood and even posted some videos on YouTube explaining how he did it  And that's how we connected - we asked him if he wanted to partake in our Tumbleweed Construction Video and Art obliged. One thing led to another and today Art is traveling the country teaching others the benefits of owning a tiny home. Read more on Art's blog.

Art's modified Tumbleweed Elm

Question: What is your favorite part of your tiny space?

Art: My favorite part of my tiny house?  The love seat when I want to sit,  or the shower when I want to get clean.  Or do I have those confused?

Art's love seat, which can convert into a bed.

Q: Do you have any space saving or downsizing advice?
Art: See video!
 
Q: What would you do different in your tiny home if you could build it again?
Art: If I built it again I would have dormers, got to keep up with the neighbors!
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EDDIE LANZO
Eddie Lanzo / Tumbleweed Workshop Host
Background:
Eddie and his girlfriend Lacey have their almost complete DIY Tumbleweed Cypress parked in a campground in Austin, Texas. Eddie's background is in real estate and he also recently joined the Tumbleweed team as a workshop host. More about their house and build here
Eddie's DIY Tumbleweed Cypress
Question:  How are you decorating your tiny space for the holidays?
Eddie: We have perched a very wintery wreath on the wall for the holidays. That should do it for us. Next year if we're more ambitious, we want to do a stick christmas tree.
Q:  Clever storage ideas / space saving ideas?
Eddie: We plan on adding loft beam storage, installing a leaf table, and putting our compost toilet on tracks that slide out from under the storage stairs.
Eddie's loft with dormers
Q: What would you do different in your tiny home if you could build it again?
Eddie: We would've finished plumbing before moving it to the RV park. It’s all “roughed out” but ABS piping still needs to be finished so we can install our sinks.
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GUILLAUME DUTILH
Guillaume Dutilh / Tumbleweed Workshop Host
Background:
Guillaume and his girlfriend Jenna finished their DIY modified Cypress since September 2014. So far they've traveled over 7,000 miles with their tiny abode, from California to Nova Scotia to Atlanta, while hosting countless open houses and Tumbleweed workshops. Learn more about their tiny house journey here. 
Guillaume's traveling DIY Cypress
Question: What do you do when you and your partner need... space?
Guillaume: We usually just take the dog for a walk since the front door is never that far. 
Q: What is biggest benefit of having a tiny house?
Guillaume: Being able to pursue my passion for photography while traveling.
Q: What would you do different in your tiny home if you could build it again?
Guillaume: If I could do it again, I'd have my corner porch on the sidewalk side or I would build a full porch (the Elm). Porches are awesome!

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about their adventure and occasionally they will be hosting Tumbleweed workshops and open houses. Be sure to follow their tiny house and giant journey.

Written by Jenna Spesard — December 10, 2014

Filed under: Art Cormier   Cypress   Elm   Experts   Holidays   SIPS   Tiny Home   Tiny House   Tiny House Giant Journey   Tiny SIP House   Tips   Tumbleweed   Workshop  

Traveling Tiny House - Stories & Tips

Tiny House GJ at Ye Olde' Mill Campground in Burnt Cabins, PA

Hi All -

Now that we've been on the road for a few weeks, Guillaume and I wanted to share our stories and travel tips. We will be scooting along the highway for the next year. So stay tuned!

Our official trip began September 2nd with our departure from Shelbyville, Illinois. If you're confused it might be because we built half of our house in Los Angeles, but at the beginning of the summer we decided to move the build to the midwest (where my family graciously let us take over their driveway). Read about our move from California to Illinois here

The construction of our house had taken over our lives for the past year, and yet, we were still scrambling to finish right up until the final gargantuan moment of our tiny exodus. It was 6pm before we slowly rolled away from my family's quiet farm town and began an 800 mile journey to our first destination: the Tumbleweed Philadelphia workshop, where our house would make its debut. Check out the below video tour of our home taken by Philadelphia workshop presenter Deek

I had never been to the east coast before, so I was very excited that the first section of our trip would take us to somewhere exotic - a place where locals don't even blink an eye as they shuffle past 300 year old buildings, coffee is served strong and meant for drinking on the go, and lobster rolls are considered a common lunch. 

Philadelphia really surprised me. I spent days just walking the streets, reading plaques and snapping photos. I'm not used to living in a place that has history, and I allowed myself to feel proud and at home. The words: "I could live here," occasionally crossed my mind.

Our Parking Spot in Philadelphia - across from the workshop

That being said, I was full of contempt for the city as we pulled our (what seemed like) enormous house through its narrow streets. Parking was impossible, which I expected. Our trailer jack clawed at the ground more than once, and every time it felt like the house was collapsing. 

Tiny House GJ Parking Illegally in Philly
Watch out wire - Here we come!!

Tips for Towing a Tiny House in North Eastern USA:

1). KNOW YOUR HEIGHT. REALLY KNOW IT. There are many low overpasses along the east coast. Our house is 13'4" and we had a few close calls. One in particular in New York City, where an overpass boasted a low clearance of 12'6"! We slowed down, frantically discussed our options and then realized that our house would fit. The sign was a lie, or a terribly un-funny joke. Either way my heart skipped a beat at the thought of reversing in NYC traffic. I cringe at the idea of a convertible tiny home. A wonderful purchase for us was an RV GPS. It alerts us of any low overpasses, weight restrictions, horizontal clearances, propane restrictions, etc. If you are going to travel often with your tiny home, buy one!

2). Watch for potholes, steep inclines / declines. Our trailer jack and chains will usually take the hit first, but I wouldn't recommend it. Take it slow and be alert. 

3). If you are still in the pre-build stage, consider placing your door on the passenger side. When parking on the side of the street, exiting the tiny house on the driver's side (or the side of traffic) can be dangerous. This tip really applies to travel anywhere, but especially relevant in an east coast city where streets can be very narrow and traffic heavy. 

4). KNOW YOUR WEIGHT. Tie down everything inside, and distribute your weight evenly. You can weigh your house at any trucker scale (LOVES or similar). Ours is a bit heavy - 9,800 lbs. This means we have to be very careful about our tongue weight. Semi-tedious work, but we often shift our belongings to the back of the house for travel to alleviate our heavy tongue. We are looking for a bigger truck to compensate for this. Currently we have a 3/4 ton diesel Ford F-250, but would like a 1 ton dually. If anyone has any advice for us about this, please feel free to comment!

5). In New York City, watch for gawking pedestrians and flying hotdogs. 

Tiny House in Central Park 

Yes, after leaving Philly we drove the house through New York City. No, we aren't insane.. well, maybe a little. A short-lived cruise through central park ended with us being kicked out; we had permission but ended up causing trouble when we couldn't navigate properly. Our tiny home crawled away with its tail between our legs to a campsite in Croton-On-Harmon, about an hour outside of the city.

Our Campsite in New York - Croton Point Park

Before leaving New York City we snapped a few photos of the tiny house amongst the skyscrapers. It was September 11th, and the significance of the anniversary was not lost on us. We tried to visit the memorial, but it was closed for family members only - a respectable request.

As the new One World Trade Center proudly served as our canopy, we remembered. 

Currently we are on our way to Montreal. My next update will be about crossing the border and staying overnight in campgrounds, truck strops or similar. Wish us luck!

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Check our OUR ROUTE and follow our journey on our website and facebook

For more photos of our journey, follow us on INSTAGRAM

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Jenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a self-built Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop host. They are photographing and writing about their adventure that began in September 2014. Occasionally they will be hosting an open house. More on their tiny house and giant journey here.

Chris's Tiny House in the Country

Chris with his Tiny Retreat in upstate New York

This past weekend Deek Diedricksen presented our Philadelphia workshop and we met a lot of wonderful attendees, many of whom aspire to build or live in a tiny home. Last year at this very same workshop, Chris Schapdick attended with a similar goal: specifically to build a tiny vacation home in the country for himself and his nine year old daughter, Mia.

"I really want my daughter to have a connection to nature." says Chris, who currently lives in New York City but has recently purchased land upstate. "Ideally we'd have a tiny home as a weekend getaway, and later I could retire in it." 

After the workshop Chris felt inspired to build his own tiny home, but like many of us, he had other obligations that took priority. "I thought about buying a trailer," Chris admits, "but I was moving slow and, honestly, the whole idea (of building my own home) was daunting."

Finally, in early 2014, Chris found his solution with the announcement of Tumbleweed's tiny house starter kit - or "barn raiser." The barn raiser was ideal for Chris because it would expedite the build process AND allow him to finish the house himself. Within a few weeks, Chris received a photo and notification that his tiny home was ready for pick up.

Tumbleweed Barn Raiser / Photo by: Tumbleweed Tiny Homes*

"It might sound corny, but when I received that photo it reminded me of seeing the first ultrasound of my daughter. I had an immediate connection with my tiny house. " Chris recalls giving countless tours of his new home while towing it from Tumbleweed's Colorado build site to his rural property in New York. "It really resonates with people." 

Chris chose a Linden Horizon floor plan which features a second downstairs bedroom for his daughter. Mia thinks her dad's tiny home is really cool, and Chris hopes she'll want to be involved on some of the interior build.

A few interesting pieces Chris has added to his tiny home include an incinerating toilet and a library rolling ladder. He also has exciting plans for the front door:  "I'd like to have a bright colored entry door, like Ella's house. I also bought an old brass ship porthole for a window insert."

Chris even installed a motion detection camera to see what wildlife might trek up to his tiny home, but one day it malfunctioned and took a photograph every minute. If you're feeling a little scrambled from your busy schedule, take a moment to watch this "day-in-the-life" video created from Chris's camera's happy accident. 

"It's amazing to see a day go by and have absolutely nothing happen...it's like that everyday." - Chris

Once in a while, there are a few furry visitors! 

Three Pieces of Advice From Chris:

1). Take your time.

2). Know that there are resources out there to help you.

3). Be confident in your own abilities and have the confidence that you can do it.

We will check back in on Chris's build later this year. In the meantime he is looking forward to receiving advice and answering questions. He is about to embark on electricity and plumbing, so any research, links or tips are welcome!

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Contact Chris through his tiny house website here.

*All photos provided by Chris unless otherwise stated.

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Jenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a self-built Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume, who is a professional photographer and Tumbleweed Workshop host. They are photographing and writing about their adventure that began in September 2014. Occasionally they will be hosting an open house. More on their tiny house and giant journey here.
 

 

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