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Do Hobbies and Tiny Spaces Mix?

Will my hobby fit in my future "tiny lifestyle?" The truth is, not all hobbies are suitable to be practiced in a tiny space, but many tiny housers find ways to integrate their passions into their Tiny House RV. Storage for your hobby crafts and gear is also possible with a little creativity. Let's take a look at a few examples. 

Photo credit: Laura & Matt from Life in 120 Square feet

Musical Hobbies

Hanging ukuleles, guitars or violins is a great way to store your musical instrument as a piece of art in your Tiny House RV. If you play a large instrument, such as piano, you will need to integrate enough space for the instrument into your design.

Ella Jenkins designed her Tumbleweed with space in mind for her beloved instruments. In the photo above, you can see her large harp resting as a background focal point while her banjo is stored on the top shelf in the foreground. It can be done!

Art Hobbies 

Are you an artist? Nowadays they make collapsible artist easels that fit perfectly in a tiny space. Try positioning your easel in an area with plenty of windows for natural light, as seen in the Tumbleweed Cypress pictured above.

Miranda is an avid knitter, and she plans on continuing her hobby in her Tumbleweed. Ella makes jewelry. Skyler runs a headband making business out of her Tiny House RV. There are plenty of artistic hobbies that can work in a small space.

Snowboard storage in "Tiny House Giant Journey"

Sports & Exercise

Sports are generally meant to be done outdoors or in an specified arena. That being said, sport equipment can be stored in a Tiny House RV. Some tiny housers even use rock climbing holds on their wall instead of a ladder! Rackets, trekking poles, snorkel masks and fins, can easily be stored or displayed in a small space. I've even seen collapsible kayaks and folding bicycles in Tiny House RVs!

Zack Giffin (Host of Tiny House Nation) uses his Tiny House RV as a mobile ski lodge! His tiny space actually advocates for his hobby! Photo credit of Zack's house.

Some exercise routines are possible in a tiny space, such as: yoga, sit ups, push ups, pulls ups, lunges, squats, etc. For exercise that requires a lot of equipment or maneuvering, a gym membership may be best.

 Mario's Big Screen TV on a Swivel Mount

Digital Entertainment

Who says you can't have a big screen TV in a Tiny House RV? Mario has not one but TWO big screen TVs in his Tumbleweed: a projection screen for the loft and a big screen on a swivel in his great room. You can easily watch football games, host movie nights or play video games in your Tiny House RV with the right entertainment system.

Ariel Canning Pasta Sauce in her Tumbleweed Cypress

Cooking & Food Preserve

If you love cooking and homesteading, you're not alone! Many tiny housers enjoy self sustainability. Ariel has a planted beautiful garden next to her Wyoming based Tumbleweed. She also enjoys canning, drying, pickling and cooks almost all of her own meals.

Ariel cooking in her Tumbleweed Cypress. Photo credit.

Some Hobbies are Made for Big Spaces

As I mentioned before, not all hobbies can fit in a Tiny House RV (or even a large home). For instance, if you're hobby is glass blowing or ballet dancing, you will probably prefer to rent a studio space. If you enjoy raising chickens, fishing and hunting, you should get outdoors.

You don't have to fit everything inside your Tiny House RV. A lot of equipment can be rented, such as: scuba gear, skis, skates, canoes, etc. Purchase art supplies as you need them. Enjoy having the freedom of mobility without clutter and materialism. You can find a way to practice your hobbies, even if that means thinking outside the box!

What is your hobby? Will it fit in a tiny space?

Related article: Do Pets and Tiny Spaces Mix?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about Tiny Homes and their adventure. Follow their informative blog. 

Tumbleweed built for Mom, by a Mother Daughter Team!

Deb began dreaming about simplifying after having a negative personal experience with managing too many belongings. She came across the tiny house movement and felt that Tiny House RVs embodied her desire for simplicity and functionality. Now Deb's daughter Chanel, who has experience in residential and commercial design, is helping her mother build her tiny dream in to a reality.

"We took a Tumbleweed workshop last May.Chanel explains. "The workshop experience was the final push to give us the confidence to get started!"

Together the mother daughter team is building Deb's Tiny House RV in Olympia, Washington. They hope to be finished by September of this year, which will mark one year of construction. 

"We have learned building a Tiny House RV is a process that should not be rushed." - Deb

Chanel customized the original Tumbleweed Elm design to compliment Deb's lifestyle and preferences. She extended one side of the structure to have a full dormer that stretches the entire length. This customization creates an a-symmetrical look and increases interior space. Deb's Tumbleweed will also have a unique storage staircase design with space for: hanging clothes, a pull out desk, an ottoman and display shelving for books and photos. 

Smart choices have to be made when designing a small space, and it takes a lot of creativity. 

Chanel believes that working on her mother's Tiny House RV has been a rewarding experience. She gets to help her mother create a space that embraces every detail of her lifestyle.

We asked Deb what it's like building with her daughter. Her answer is too good not to share:

"It has been a wonderful experience, everyday we learn something new together. We understand how each other thinks so we are able to put our heads together and solve problems. We also have the help of Chanel’s fiancé, Marshall, who has construction experience and has been our teacher every step of the way. The three of us make a great team, and when things get hairy we take a break and have a glass of wine. My Tiny House RV could not have been built without many heated discussions, long trips to Home Depot and laughs over wine."

For more information and photographs of Deb's Tiny House RV, check out Chanel's blog

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about Tiny Homes and their adventure. Follow their informative blog. 
 
     

Written by Jenna Spesard — March 18, 2016

Filed under: daughter   elm   family   mother   olympia   tiny home   tiny house   Tiny House movement   tiny house rv   trailer   tumbleweed   washington   workshop  

How to change a flat tire on your Tiny House RV

Tumbleweed trailers are equipped with special trailer radial tires, which are rated to carry the weight load of a Tiny House RV. Of course, like any tires, they are not impervious to sharp objects! What happens when you have a flat tire on the road? How can you lift your heavy Tiny House RV? It's important to think ahead and have a plan for such situations.

Below we've listed a few options for changing a flat tire on your Tiny House RV

OPTION ONE: Patch & Tow to Repair Shop

If your tire is patchable, you can patch the tire and tow your Tiny House RV slowly to the nearest repair shop. Be sure to call ahead to make sure they can accommodate you. Bring in your spare tire, or ask the shop if they have the correct tire in stock. It is vital to use tires that are rated to hold the weight of your Tiny House RV. Otherwise, they can blow!

tiny house flat tire

Tiny House flat tire being fixed at a repair shop

OPTION TWO: Change the Flat Tire Youself, Using a Trailer Jack

You can also change the tire yourself using a trailer jack. Do NOT use the scissor jacks on your trailer to lift your Tiny House RV. Scissors jack are not rated to support the weight of your Tiny House RV without the tires. They are meant for stability and support. 

There are many trailer jacks available for purchase. We recommend the Anderson Rapid Jack because it is extremely portable and affordable (about $50). Plus, we've actually seen it in action on Tumbleweed trailers. The Anderson Rapid Jack can lift your wheel about 7 inches. 

Tiny House flat tire

Steps for using the Anderson Rapid Jack:

  1. Place the Rapid Jack under the good wheel on the same side of the wheel that needs to be changed.
  2. Slowly drive onto the Rapid Jack, which will lift one side of your trailer.
  3. Adjust your scissor jacks and tongue jack for stability as you drive onto the Rapid Jack
  4. Keep driving onto the Rapid Jack until the flat wheel is suspended.
  5. Place a wheel chock under the Rapid Jack to secure it in place.

Watch the video below to see how to use the Rapid Jack. The video is a little cheesy, but it is also informative! 

If you have a Tumbleweed trailer, the Anderson Rapid Jack will fit between your fender and tire, but you will need to place is perfectly. This is especially important when coming off the Rapid Jack. If the Rapid Jack is about to touch the fender, use a mallet to wiggle the Rapid Jack out from under the wheel.

Tiny House flat tire

Although it's difficult to see, the wheel on the right is suspended in the above photo

If you need to lift your wheel more than 7 inches, you can try driving up onto a few blocks of wood before using the Rapid Jack (as pictured above and below). If you are parked on soft turf, such as mud or sand, it will be very difficult to lift your trailer. In these special situations, you might need to call a mechanic.

Tiny House flat tire

Steps for changing a trailer tire yourself:

Changing a trailer tire is very similar to changing a car tire.

  1. Loosen the lug nuts while the wheel is still on the ground.
  2. Lift the Tiny House RV using a trailer jack (see instructions above for Anderson Rapid Jack) just enough so that the flat wheel is hovering just over the ground. 
  3. Remove the flat wheel and replace it with the good spare.
  4. Tighten the lug nuts as much as you can by hand, wiggling the new wheel in place. Tighten bolts or nuts in the sequence shown:
  5. Lower the trailer back to the ground and tighten the lug nuts once more to the appropriate torque.
  6. Drive a few dozen miles and re-torque the lug nuts to the right specification. Once that’s done, you are good to go!

OPTION THREE: Call a Roadside Mechanic

If you cannot patch your tire or change the tire yourself, then you will need to call a roadside mechanic. Make sure to tell the mechanic the weight of your trailer. Be as descriptive as possible. Try calling local RV repair shops and asking for roadside mechanic recommendations.

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard has changed three tires on her Tumbleweed Cypress after driving 23,000 miles. Follow her informative tiny house blog. 
 
     

Written by Jenna Spesard — March 14, 2016

Filed under: flat tire   tiny home   tiny house   tiny house rv   trailer   trailer jack   tumbleweed  

Fifth Wheel Tiny House RV, designed by a Young Couple

We have a very special Tiny House RV story to share with you this week. Introducing Brian and Skyler's custom Fifth Wheel Tiny House RV!

Fifth wheel tiny house

Brian & Skyler's "Fifth Wheel" Tiny House RV

The fifth wheel design is a popular concept in the tiny house movement that hardly ever sees fruition. What's so great about a fifth wheel tiny house RV? You get extra space for an elevated bedroom over the gooseneck! Also, fifth wheel trailers are designed for heavier loads than regular utility trailers. 

fifth wheel tiny house

Brian and Skyler decided to on a fifth wheel trailer because they didn't want to climb into a loft, especially because Brian is very tall. They also intend on keeping their tiny for many years. The hope is that the design will fit their lifestyle throughout the decades. 

"A big focus of ours was a space for EVERYTHING. We listed all our possessions and designed the space around storage options." - Brian

The young couple was inspired to go tiny for financial freedom and to pursue their dream of moving out west. Both Skyler and Brian have a bachelor's degree in building construction. Their fifth wheel design is 100% custom and something they are very proud of achieving. 

"Even with extensive construction experience, building a house on a trailer is no easy feat!" -Skyler

Specs on Brian & Skyler's Fifth Wheel Tiny House RV:

  • Material Cost: $35,000 (which does not include labor) 
  • Construction Timeline: 8 months, finished in December 2015.
  • Build location: Skyler's father owns a manufacturing company in Columbus, Mississippi, and was kind enough to allow them to build in his warehouse. 
  • Square Footage: 255 square feet
  • Weight: 20,000 lbs (approximate)

tiny house space saver

Brian & Skyler's Space Saver Ideas

The unique shape of Brian and Skyler's tiny is not the only surprise this couple dreamed up! Check out the below list of "space savers" they incorporated into their design:

  • Hidden dog house – Their dog (Sadie) has a hidden bed built into the staircase!
  • Jewelry Storage – Brian built doors that open a hollow space inside the bathroom wall for small storage. Skyler hangs her jewelry in this space on a pegboard.
  • Tool Closet Underneath Gooseneck – Because Brian and Skyler have a significant amount of tools, they built a tool closet underneath the gooseneck.
  • Stair Drawers – The stairs have pull out drawers for extra storage.
  • Closet – Brian and Skyler made trailer modifications so that the load of their bedroom was properly supported. In doing so, they also built a closet underneath their bed.

 A Tiny Business on Wheels

Skyler runs her own small business making homemade headbands. She will be running this business, called SugarSky, out of her Tiny House RV! How cool is that?

"I will be working from home and running this business out of our tiny house!" Skyler explains."It’s an exciting adventure that will continue to make SugarSky a lean, organized company"

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To view more photos of Brian and Skyler's tiny called "Wandering on Wheels" follow them on Instagram.

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about Tiny Homes and their adventure. Follow their informative blog. 
 
     

Written by Jenna Spesard — March 09, 2016

Filed under: couple   design   fifth wheel   mississippi   space savers   tiny home   tiny house   tiny house rv   tumbleweed  

5 Reasons to attend a Tumbleweed Workshop

Everyone who attends a Tumbleweed workshop is an alternative thinker and dreamer!

At Tumbleweed we host over 30 "Dream Big, Go Tiny" workshops annually all over the United States and a few in Canada. We strive to improve our presentation with the latest and greatest information and have a team of people dedicated to our workshops. We don't consider it "work" to teach others the skills necessary to build a Tiny House RV. Helping others achieve their dreams is fun and fulfilling! 

Whichever build workshop you choose to attend, either hosted by Tumbleweed or another reputable company, we know you'll walk away with a positive outlook on the tiny house movement. It's time to your first step, and GO TINY! 

5 Reasons to Attend a Tumbleweed Workshop:

1). Presenters share personal stories (and mistakes)

Coming from all over the country, Tumbleweed workshop presenters have either built, designed, or owned (any many times all of the above) a Tiny House RV. Many of them started out by attending a Tumbleweed workshop!

"I always share the story of how I crashed my Tiny House RV because I forgot one simple safety feature." - Guillaume Dutilh, workshop presenter

Not only will our presenters inform you on the best building practices specific to Tiny House RVs, but they'll also share personal advice of what NOT to do. These anecdotes have saved hundreds of workshop attendees from making costly mistakes.

2). Meet other local enthusiasts

Our weekend workshops range from 60-100 attendees from diverse backgrounds! That's a lot of people gathered in one room with similar interests. On the Saturday evening of our workshop weekend, we hold a social mixer. Not only is this event a lot fun, it's also a great opportunity for attendees to mingle and exchange contact information. At the end of the workshop, we also send out an e-mail contact list (to those that wish to participate) so that attendees can keep in touch.

Many times, attendees will volunteer to help construct each other's Tiny House RVs. Sometimes experienced carpenters, plumbers, and electricians attending the workshop will share advice and offer to work on local projects. Mingling with other local enthusiasts at the workshop can help you find free/cheap labor and life long friends! 

Image taken from current Tumbleweed Workshop Workbook

3). Learn SPECIFIC Tiny House RV build methods

Tiny House RV construction is a blend of regular home construction and RV construction. Building a road-worthy structure will require meeting certain specifications. Although the Tumbleweed workshop is mostly focused on beginner build methods, even the most experienced carpenter will learn a few tricks that apply specifically to Tiny House RV construction. 

Image taken from current Tumbleweed Workshop Workbook

4). Gather resources on appliances, green energy, tiny travel and off-grid practices

Over the years, Tumbleweed has updated their workshop presentation to include the latest and greatest information relevant to the industry. At the workshop you'll learn about small space appliances, green energy, as well as travel and off-grid practices that will help you create an efficient and functional Tiny House RV. These resources are absolutely priceless and will save you hundreds (if not thousands) of dollars on your build. 

Image taken from Tumbleweed Workshop Workbook

5). Get inspired, ask questions and receive DISCOUNTS!

At the Tumbleweed workshop you'll receive a workbook with hundreds of colorful, detailed photographs. Flip through the pages of your workbook and circle your favorite styles, appliances and space saving ideas. Interested in multi-purpose furniture, a downstairs bedroom, or an affordable portable solar system? No problem! Get inspired by Tiny House RV images and stories from the workshop staff. 

At the workshop, you'll have plenty of opportunities to chat with a member of the workshop staff. This is your chance to ask questions and get real, unbiased answers. 

Get the answer to these FAQs and many more:

What is it really like to use a compost toilet?

Where can you park your Tiny House Rv?

How is it sharing the space with your significant other?

What heater should I choose?

How much does a typical Tiny House RV weigh? 

TUMBLEWEED OFFERS DISCOUNTS TO THEIR WORKSHOP ATTENDEES!

At the workshop, you'll be informed of a variety of discounts on Tumbleweed products. So, if you already know you want to purchase a trailer, barn raiser or fully built RV, attending a workshop might pay for itself! 

Is there a Tiny House RV available to tour at every Tumbleweed workshop?

We always strive to have a Tiny House RV available to tour at each of our 30+ annual workshops scattered throughout the country, but this is not always possible. When there is an owner located in the area willing to let attendees walk through their Tiny House RV, we organize a tour to happen during the two day workshop. For obvious reasons, not every Tiny House RV owner is willing to open their space to our attendees and we absolutely respect their privacy. 

As the list of Tiny House RV owners grows with every passing year, tours are becoming more and more common at our workshops. When a tour is not possible, our workshop staff will tape layouts on the floor to provide a similar spacial awareness effect.  

Will we see you at one of our workshops this year?

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Jenna BioJenna Spesard is currently living and traveling around North America in a DIY Tumbleweed Cypress with her partner, Guillaume. They are photographing and writing about Tiny Homes and their adventure. Follow their informative blog. 
 
     

Written by Jenna Spesard — February 26, 2016

Filed under: build   construction   dream big   go tiny   tiny home   tiny house   tumbleweed   workshop  

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