Heating Your Tiny House

Four Ways to Heat Your Tiny House

When you build your own Tumbleweed, heat is one issue you need to think about. The type of heating you choose will depend upon where the final destination of your tiny house will be.

Normal central heat or large wood stoves, etc., just produce too much heat for your small space. So what are some of your options? In this article we will look at some ideas for using four types of heat. Wood, gas, propane and electric heat.

Wood

The original Very Small Woodstove is the Jotul 602, from Norway. This model is a mere 12 inches wide, 19 inches deep. They are found most often in cottages and cabins in the woods, where the 602’s good looks are a highlight. It’s been around almost forever. Although very small it can heat amazingly well.

Jotul 602

12 x 19

$700

Available from Jotul

The tiniest very small woodstoves are those built for boats. These are designed for very tight quarters, and often have a railing on the top to keep pots from rolling off. Here is a typical one from the Canadian coast measuring all of 12 inches by 12 inches. They are made of cast iron and porcelain and are so cute and enchanting, folks have thought of getting a sailboat just so they need one. You can use one in your tiny house just as easily.

Sardine

12 x 12

$650

Available from Marine Stove

Propane

Propane is also popular in tiny houses and Tumbleweed uses the Dickinson heater. This lovely little heater/fireplace. Ideal for boats or houses up to 32 ft. The combustion process is completely isolated from the inside of the structure by the unique, direct vent design. A built-in blower provides good heat circulation. Heater is sold with all accessories including a stainless steel backing plate and 28" of flexible, double stainless chimney. Safe, easy to use and extremely economical.

Newport Propane Fireplace (P9000)

17 x 9

$1044

Available from Dickson Marine

Gas

Gas is also an option and Woodstock Soapstone Company has the perfect little stove for tiny spaces called the Cottage Mini Soapstone Gas Stove.

 

    It’s 8,000 BTU heat output is perfect for a cozy, intimate area. It takes up little space (it can be installed on a stand or wall- mounted shelf). It’s a handsome design.

The Mini Franklin(tm) will bring warmth, grace, and style to any room setting. Its small fire will add ambiance and though it is just 17" tall, it will produce almost 8,000 BTU/hr!

Cottage Mini

17 x 14

$1049

Available from Woodstock Soapstone Company

Electric

There are many small electric heaters that will work extremely well in your tiny house. Following are a couple examples available at your local Walmart. Electric heaters cost much less than the above wood stoves and propane or gas stoves. If electricity is easily available this might be your most affordable option.

Oil-Filled Radiator De’Longhi EW0715W Safeheat Oil-Filled Radiator features Patented Easy Snap Wheels, Adjustable Thermostat and Three Heat Settings

$39.87

Available from Walmart

Titan Ceramic Heater with Thermostat #TCM16W-U

Compact yet powerful, this ceramic heater sports a thermostat that lets you choose how much heat you want.

$18.44

Available from Walmart Toe Kick Heater

Qmark QTS1500T

Electric Kickspace Heater (120 Volts)

$156

A toe-space heater will fit where no other heater will. It can be recessed into toe space areas under kitchen or utility room cabinets or into the soffit area above them.

It can also be recessed into the risers of a stairway or under the vanity in the bathroom. It is convenient for checkout counters, ticket or toll booths and many other places where no other heater seems to fit.

Hopefully this will give you some ideas and a starting point to figure out what type of heat is best for your tiny home.

Written by Kent Griswold — March 06, 2009

Filed under: Build it yourself  

My Lusby

Ladder

Do you remember the first time you threw a blanket over a card table or clothes line and crawled inside? That supremely satisfied feeling of being in your own small space? That’s how I feel in my Tumbleweed house. It’s especially true whenever I climb up into the sleeping loft and peer down at the cozy space below. I had a small house before this one – less than a thousand square feet - but there were rooms I seldom entered. It seemed that the dog and cats and I spent most of our time together in the kitchen, the bedroom, or the living room. Now we must share a smaller space, which, of course, has meant that we’ve all had to make some adjustments.

Both cats have finally learned to climb the ladder. I’m working on a shelving scheme that will allow them to move up and down without the ladder, so I don’t have to play elevator or move the ladder when I’m at home. Rosebud, my standard poodle, is very patient at taking indoor traffic direction from me, but he sometimes prefers to stay outside, supervising activities in the RV park. I’m always surprised when he tries a new spot for snoozing or cat and dog share a space - new behaviors for them!

Front Door

Everything has a place and needs to be in that place. My stainless steel cookware is a decorative accent over one of the windows and cloth covered boxes keep my personal items at hand but out of sight. No letting my mail pile up for days before dealing with it. Dishes get done at the end of the meal. But I can spend a good hour and the house is spic and span, while in my bigger house, an hour would’ve barely made a dent! Even in this small house, I still can sit in the living room, curl up with a book on the bench in the office, sit on the porch steps for some sun, or climb upstairs for a nap. I feel like Goldilocks who found a space that is just right!

Upstairs

Written by Cathy from Oregon — February 12, 2009

Filed under: Houses  

Steve N. builds tiny house

 

After attending the design workshop in Sebastopol, Steve N. built his own tiny house. The design was his own creation.

The Tiny House Blog has several pictures as well.

Written by Steve Weissmann — February 05, 2009

Filed under: Build it yourself  

Man throws nothing away for 1 year.

Sustainable Dave, as he's known, and his family are leading by example. For 1 year, he threw nothing away. Visit his blog 365daysoftrash.blogspot.com to learn more.

Written by Steve Weissmann — December 23, 2008

Filed under: Houses  

Cathy's Lusby

Cathy

Congratulations to Cathy from Brookings, Oregon.

"I love all the wood - the look and the smell. The owner of the RV park got a real kick out of my first month's electric bill - $1.60! Yes, you read that correctly, one dollar and sixty cents! I keep the place lighted at night with one 60 watt bulb in a fixture pointed at the ceiling. It is a lovely, warm light. The heater works well and the water heater as well." - Cathy

Written by Steve Weissmann — December 08, 2008

Filed under: Houses  
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