7 Ways You Can Protect Your Tumbleweed From Theft

Imagine spending thousands of dollars to buy or build your own Tiny House RV, only to have it stolen. The mere thought is heartbreaking. Don’t let this happen to you! Below I’ve listed 7 precautions you can take to prevent Tiny House theft.

Tiny House theft! Don’t let your Tumbleweed leave without your permission.

1). Use a Hitch Lock

Locking your hitch is one of the simplest ways you can protect yourself from Tiny House theft. Of course there are ways a thief can remove a hitch lock, but this is a good start.

Tiny House Theft

2). Block the Wheels or Use a Lock

Lock at least one of your wheels with a wheel lock. If you are planning to park in the same location for a long time, you can pile bricks in front of your wheels. This will make moving the Tiny House RV a difficult task. You can also remove the wheels or put your Tiny on blocks, but this is only for permanent parking situations. This post is NOT about making your Tiny House RV immobile, but instead, preventing it from moving without your permission.

Tiny House Theft

Imagine credit: TinyHouseTalk

3). Chain your trailer

Another idea would be to chain your trailer to a tree or permanent structure. Heavy duty chains work best. The more difficult you make it to steal your Tiny House RV, the less likely a thief will bother.

4). Hide a GPS Tracker

Purchase a GPS tracker and hide it somewhere on your trailer. This way, if your Tiny is stolen, you can easily retrieve it.

Tiny House Theft

5). Make your Hitch Inaccessible

If you have access to a trailer dolly, such as this one,  it’s a good idea to maneuver your Tiny into a parking spot where it is impossible to fit a tow vehicle. For example, you can place your hitch against a wall, fence or tree. *Disclaimer: Make sure your dolly can handle the weight (and tongue weight) of your Tiny House RV*

Video courtesy of: TravelValet 

6). Install Home Security Systems

Similar to a regular home, you can place security lights and cameras around the perimeter of your parking spot. You can also hang signs that say: “Smile you’re on camera” and install alarm systems on your door. The amount of home security systems you should install is dependent on your parking location and personal preference.

7). Alert Your Neighbors

Tell your neighbors if you are leaving town. If they see someone lurking around your Tiny House RV while you are away, they can alert you or call the police.

BONUS TIP! When all else fails: have Insurance.

With a RVIA certified Tumbleweed, it’s easy to get insurance for your Tiny House RV. Find out why the RVIA certification is so important.

Do you have security tips? Share them in the comments!


Jenna BioJenna Spesard built a custom Tiny House RV in 2014 and traveled with it for one year, clocking over 25,000 miles. Today she lives simply in Mt. Hood Tiny House Village and writes about the Tiny House Movement and travel on her blog: “Tiny House Giant Journey.”

12 Comments

  1. Alex January 17, 2017 at 11:44 am - Reply

    Hi Jenna thanks for the shout out! Can’t beat tip #7 either! Another bonus tip I can think of to share is to try and get somebody to stay in your tiny while you’re gone? Maybe a friend, relative, or even just renting it on Airbnb. Better yet, maybe you can even “swap places” with somebody for future trips.

    • Jenna Spesard January 19, 2017 at 1:29 am - Reply

      Good idea. Thanks Alex! Love your blog!

    • N.D. January 28, 2017 at 12:38 am - Reply

      I have house sat (regular houses) a few times now. I love it. I cant always afford a holiday but staying in another home all by myself gives me respite from the regular demands in my life that at times get overwhelming.

      I love it. I get to recharge my batteries and the owners know their home is occupied and with me it will be spotless when they get back. Besides I get to check out what I might or might not want in my tiney (yes big houses can still give you ideas). Its a win win. And I would be more than happy to house sit a tiny.

  2. Michael Mortensen January 23, 2017 at 10:04 pm - Reply

    “Smile, you’re on camera”

    Good pointers

  3. Donnie January 26, 2017 at 6:17 am - Reply

    http://www.sleepercellalarm.com

    -No monthly fee
    -Draws no power from your 12v lantern battery until a door is opened OR it detects your trailer being moved
    -Communicates with you via text messaging from any phone

  4. Donnie January 26, 2017 at 8:33 am - Reply

    Sleeper Cell Trailer Alarm

    -No monthly fee
    -Draws NO power until a door has been opened OR it detects your tiny house being moved.
    -Notifys you via text messages to up to 5 cell phones

  5. J.D. White January 26, 2017 at 11:22 am - Reply

    Thanks for the tips – Very good info except for number 3 – a pair of bolt cutters will easily go through chain – and many types of pad locks.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZnisybIqrs

    Look for locks featuring minimum shackle exposure.

  6. Carolyn January 26, 2017 at 11:28 am - Reply

    Sorry, but I have to say it’s “Smile, you’re on camera”.

  7. Bonnie January 26, 2017 at 12:21 pm - Reply

    @Michael, you beat me to the correction!

    @Jenna, great ideas!

  8. J.D. White January 26, 2017 at 2:44 pm - Reply

    Regarding #2 – using cinder blocks, bricks, etc,… – make sure and use termite shields (cheap) in areas prone to termites. Anything that provides a path from the ground to the bottom of the trailer will allow termites to build tunnels on the backside of the bricks – you won’t immediately notice them. And especially cinder blocks that have holes through them would provide a cool damp place for termites to go back and forth “to work”

    Just something to consider and watch out for.

  9. Robby January 27, 2017 at 2:22 am - Reply

    Get a cargo home if they can move my house! Well they need it more that me! They always need a big ass flat bed truck .. I do like the gps ideal best =)

  10. Russ Stevens January 28, 2017 at 7:19 am - Reply

    You can also put the house on jacks and remove the wheels on at least one side. That’s what I did after someone cut through my hitch lock and stole my house (luckily, I got it back).

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