7 Ways You Can Protect Your Tumbleweed From Theft

Imagine spending thousands of dollars to buy or build your own Tiny House RV, only to have it stolen. The mere thought is heartbreaking. Don’t let this happen to you! Below I’ve listed 7 precautions you can take to prevent Tiny House theft.

Tiny House theft! Don’t let your Tumbleweed leave without your permission.

1). Use a Hitch Lock

Locking your hitch is one of the simplest ways you can protect yourself from Tiny House theft. Of course there are ways a thief can remove a hitch lock, but this is a good start.

Tiny House Theft

2). Block the Wheels or Use a Lock

Lock at least one of your wheels with a wheel lock. If you are planning to park in the same location for a long time, you can pile bricks in front of your wheels. This will make moving the Tiny House RV a difficult task. You can also remove the wheels or put your Tiny on blocks, but this is only for permanent parking situations. This post is NOT about making your Tiny House RV immobile, but instead, preventing it from moving without your permission.

Tiny House Theft

Imagine credit: TinyHouseTalk

3). Chain your trailer

Another idea would be to chain your trailer to a tree or permanent structure. Heavy duty chains work best. The more difficult you make it to steal your Tiny House RV, the less likely a thief will bother.

4). Hide a GPS Tracker

Purchase a GPS tracker and hide it somewhere on your trailer. This way, if your Tiny is stolen, you can easily retrieve it.

Tiny House Theft

5). Make your Hitch Inaccessible

If you have access to a trailer dolly, such as this one,  it’s a good idea to maneuver your Tiny into a parking spot where it is impossible to fit a tow vehicle. For example, you can place your hitch against a wall, fence or tree. *Disclaimer: Make sure your dolly can handle the weight (and tongue weight) of your Tiny House RV*

Video courtesy of: TravelValet 

6). Install Home Security Systems

Similar to a regular home, you can place security lights and cameras around the perimeter of your parking spot. You can also hang signs that say: “Smile you’re on camera” and install alarm systems on your door. The amount of home security systems you should install is dependent on your parking location and personal preference.

7). Alert Your Neighbors

Tell your neighbors if you are leaving town. If they see someone lurking around your Tiny House RV while you are away, they can alert you or call the police.

BONUS TIP! When all else fails: have Insurance.

With a RVIA certified Tumbleweed, it’s easy to get insurance for your Tiny House RV. Find out why the RVIA certification is so important.

Do you have security tips? Share them in the comments!


Jenna BioJenna Spesard built a custom Tiny House RV in 2014 and traveled with it for one year, clocking over 25,000 miles. Today she lives simply in Mt. Hood Tiny House Village and writes about the Tiny House Movement and travel on her blog: “Tiny House Giant Journey.”