Tumbleweed Logo Contest

Over $1000 worth of cash and prizes to the top 3 logo designs.

We are holding a contest for our new logo on 99designs.com. Prize money is $150, $100, and $50 cash prize to our 3 favorite entries. After we have selected the top 3 choices, they will be tested on our website for 2 weeks with the winner of that contest earning a free set of home plans to build a Tumbleweed Tiny House (details listed below).

Rules: Visit 99designs.com for the "brief" on the logo contest.

All designs must be submitted to 99designs.com in order to be eligible for the cash prize. Once we have 3 designs, we will create 3 different homepages for our website. Each homepage will feature a different logo. We will use google website optimizer to rotate the 3 pages and measure the click through rate of the 3 different pages. Whichever page has the best click through rate at the end of 14 days (or when 1 design reaches a 90% confidence level as the winner) will get their choice of plans from the following list: XS-House, Epu, Weebee, Lusby, Tarelton, Fencl, Bodega, Loring, Harbinger, Enesti or B-53. We will pay up to $25 of shipping cost. Anything over $25 to be paid by winner.

Written by Steve Weissmann — March 02, 2010

Filed under: Business  

High School to Build Tiny House

Sue Danic spent summers in her gram's pre-World War I cottage and ever since, she's wanted a tiny house. She's seen it all: straw-bale, cob, rammed earth, cabins, sheds, tree-houses. Or, at least, she's bought the book, visited the website or attended the workshop. In 2009, Sue traveled to New York City to attend our tiny house building seminar. Eureka. She hit gold. Since, she couldn't build on her gram's land, a tiny house on wheels would solve her first problem. Problem Number two was building the thing. Sue has almost zero talent in building. Sure, she's built a table and even a bench, but a project of this size was beyond her grasp.

Enter Bob St. Cyr who teaches construction and cabinet making at Kitchener Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational School (KCI). This was a project that Bob thought his construction and cabinet making classes could accomplish under his guidance. The plan is to build the entire structure in one semester. The students will not only build and finish the interior, but they will blog about their accomplishments while building the Fencl.

Written by Steve Weissmann — February 28, 2010

Filed under: Build it yourself  

Building the Fencl

Over the spring of 2009 we built our largest home on wheels, the Fencl. This small house is 130 square feet and features a kitchen, bathroom, sleeping loft, fireplace and much more.

How long did it take to build?

A crew 4 built this house over 10 weeks. We spent 825 hours to purchase materials and build this green design house.

How much did it cost to build?

When all was said and done we spent $19,148. We shopped around and shaved almost $2,000 from the cost when he found a trailer 100 miles away at a much lower cost.

Build one myself?

Depending on your skill level and determination it is possible to build a mobile home for a fraction of the cost of buying on already built. We do recommend hiring licensed contractors for the plumbing and electric work. When we build a house we hire specialist for those tasks. Typically, the electrician and plumber are the highest paid people per hour, so we keep the amount of their work limited to just those two areas. We spent less than $2000 to have that work completed on the Fencl. When we build a small house we usually hire a finish carpenter as the job foreman. We keep the number of workers at any given time to 2 or 3. Aside from the finish carpenter and electrician and plumber, the other crew doesn't need as much experience.

 

Buy this house from Tumbleweed?

This green home can be purchased for $53,997 plus shipping and applicable tax.

Is the price negotiable?

We price our homes and home plans with a very low markup. We do not leave room in our pricing for a discount. Our expenses are subsidized by selling ad space on our website and by the sale of our books. We are proud of the fact that we pay our crew a fair US wage with insurance.

Written by Steve Weissmann — January 26, 2010

Filed under: Build it yourself  

Inside Ben and Sabrina's Enesti

In 2008, Ben and Sabrina built a modified version of the Enesti. Take a look inside.

Written by Steve Weissmann — January 25, 2010

Filed under: Houses  

Salvaged RV into a Tiny House

damaged-rv-trailer

Salvaging an old or destroyed RV trailer can be a great way to furnish your tiny house. Many salvageable items can be claimed from an old trailer to be used again in a tiny house on wheels.

The above photo shows a 32 foot trailer that was listed in Kentucky for $600. The side was ripped off but the owner still had the sink, tub and other appliances available that were included in the purchase. Watch your local craigslist for bargains like these or check around your town, you may find someone who would be happy for you to take it, just to get it out of their way.

The base trailer was not damaged so the the outer shell could be completely removed and you would than have a 32 foot trailer to build your tiny house on. You could than salvage all the internal items, such as the electrical control system, plumbing and water supply. Re-use the furniture and cabinets and incorporate the kitchen appliances and bathroom toilet and tub into your tiny house.

What is not salvageable you could take to the dump or donate to a local charity organization. Below are a list of three things that you should consider as options when using an old RV.

  1. RV components are designed to withstand trailering long distances, are made to be turned off for many months, so they are very durable.
  2. Most RV’s utilize 12 volt direct current systems or DC electricity, so generally use 12 volt appliances. However they usually have an inverter for when they are plugged into a grid which converts everything back to AC usage. Most inverters will transfer back and forth automatically.
  3. Many RV’s have portable gas stoves that can be moved in and out of your home. Many of the new bathrooms are one peace and incorporate everything in them form tub to toilet, so this can make setting up your new space a relatively easy process.

So keep your eyes open at your local craigslist and ebay for a great deal and you may find that you will have just about all the items you need for furnishing your tiny home. by Kent Griswold

trotwood-kitchen

rv-stove

Written by Kent Griswold — October 30, 2009

Filed under: Build it yourself  
Tumbleweed Tiny House Company
bodega loring nv
harbinger Whidbey sebastarosa
enesti b53 zglass

Recent Posts

Categories

Recent Comments


Free Catalog

Customer Showcase

Amish Barn Raiser

Tumbleweed Trailer

Olympia Workshop May 3-4. On Sale Now. Click here.